Saturday, March 19, 2016

Creator credits for Daredevil (season 2)

The usual caveats apply; I base who created a character or story element primarily on the writer/artist credit boxes from the first appearance, but the character or element could have easily originated with someone else. Any corrections? Let me know!

Frank Miller: creator of Elektra, Matt's college girlfriend, an ambassador's daughter who learned of his abilities; Elektra becoming an assassin who wields two sai in battle while wearing a red costume; of Columbia Law as Nelson & Murdock's college; of Grotto, a minor criminal (Daredevil #168, 1981); of Stick, Matt and Elektra's mentor; of the Hand surviving being lit on fire (Daredevil #176, 1981); of the Hand's ability to mystically resurrect fallen warriors (Daredevil #187, 1982); of Stick's order and their war against the Hand ninja clan (Daredevil #188, 1982); of the Hand, a clan of evil ninjas who battle Daredevil and Elektra (Daredevil #174, 1981); of Wilson Fisk's name; of Wilson Fisk as Daredevil's primary enemy (Daredevil #170, 1981); of Stick training Matt how to use his powers (Daredevil #177, 1981); of the Hand seeking to make Elektra their chief warrior and resurrect her (Daredevil #190, 1982); of Elektra being killed with one of her own sai (Daredevil #181, 1982); co-creator of Daredevil and Punisher being fellow vigilantes but disagreeing sharply on how extreme their crimefighting methods should go (Daredevil #183, 1982); of Josie's Bar, a dive bar in Hell's Kitchen tended by the titular Josie (Daredevil #160, 1979); of Turk as a recurring foe of Daredevil (Daredevil #159, 1979); of Murdock wearing stubble in both of his identities (Daredevil #228, 1986); of Roscoe Sweeney's last name; of Hell's Kitchen as Matt Murdock's childhood borough (Daredevil #164, 1980); of Wilson Fisk controlling the police (Daredevil #227, 1986); of Melvin Potter's name; of Melvin's lady friend Betsy; of Melvin's mental problems (Daredevil #166, 1980); of the Hand worshipping a demon (Elektra: Assassin #1, 1986); of Sister Maggie, a nun who cares for Daredevil (Daredevil #229, 1986); of Sister Maggie tending to Matt after he was first blinded (Daredevil #230, 1986); of the Punisher being sent to prison (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #15, 1981)

Stan Lee: co-creator of Matt Murdock, a lawyer who also fights crime as Daredevil by using his superhuman sensory powers; Daredevil costume with horns on head and red lenses; billy club as Daredevil's primary weapon; Murdock as son of a boxer; the elder Murdock dying after crossing a crooked boxing promoter and refusing to lose a fixed fight; Fogwell's Gym as Murdock's training place; Murdock partnered with his slightly overweight college friend Franklin "Foggy" Nelson at Nelson & Murdock law firm; Karen Page as Murdock & Nelson's secretary and object of affection to both men (Daredevil #1, 1964); of Daredevil's red costume; of Daredevil's gimmick billy club which includes a cable line (Daredevil #7, 1965); of Daredevil's ability to detect lies (Daredevil #3, 1964); of the Kingpin of Crime, a New York mob boss (Amazing Spider-Man #50, 1967); of the Kingpin's wife, Vanessa (Amazing Spider-Man #69, 1969); of Gladiator, a costume designer who makes a Daredevil costume; Gladiator wearing body armor and wielding a saw (Daredevil #18, 1966); of the Stilt-Man; of Matt becoming involved with Karen (Daredevil #8, 1965)

Roger McKenzie: co-creator of Daredevil and Punisher being fellow vigilantes but disagreeing sharply on how extreme their crimefighting methods should go (Daredevil #183, 1982); of Josie's Bar, a dive bar in Hell's Kitchen tended by the titular Josie (Daredevil #160, 1979); of Turk as a recurring foe of Daredevil (Daredevil #159, 1979); of Roscoe Sweeney's last name; of Hell's Kitchen as Matt Murdock's childhood borough (Daredevil #164, 1980); of Melvin Potter's name; of Melvin's lady friend Betsy; of Melvin's mental problems (Daredevil #166, 1980); of Ben Urich, an aging reporter with a relentless dedication to the truth (Daredevil #153, 1978)

Bill Everett: co-creator of Matt Murdock, a lawyer who also fights crime as Daredevil by using his superhuman sensory powers; Daredevil costume with horns on head and red lenses; billy club as Daredevil's primary weapon; Murdock as son of a boxer; the elder Murdock dying after crossing a crooked boxing promoter and refusing to lose a fixed fight; Fogwell's Gym as Murdock's training place; Murdock partnered with his slightly overweight college friend Franklin "Foggy" Nelson at Nelson & Murdock law firm; Karen Page as Murdock & Nelson's secretary and object of affection to both men (Daredevil #1, 1964)

Gene Colan: co-creator of Turk Barrett, a gangster who fights Daredevil (Daredevil #69, 1970); of Ben Urich, an aging reporter with a relentless dedication to the truth (Daredevil #153, 1978); of Gladiator, a costume designer who makes a Daredevil costume; Gladiator wearing body armor and wielding a saw (Daredevil #18, 1966); of the prison Ryker's Island (Daredevil #63, 1970); of Blake Tower, New York district attorney frequently embroiled in Nelson & Murdock's affairs (Daredevil #124, 1975); of Karen Page learning Matt Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #57, 1969)

Gerry Conway: co-creator of the Punisher, a war veteran who becomes a vigilante, wearing a black costume with white skull design on his chest and wielding vast arsenal of firearms and explosives in a one-man war on crime (Amazing Spider-Man #129, 1974); of Frank Castle becoming the Punisher after happening upon criminals in a park who set off a gunfight which killed his wife Maria, daughter Lisa and son Frank Jr. (Marvel Preview #2, 1975); of the Punisher maintaining safehouses (Giant-Size Spider-Man #4, 1975)

John Romita: co-creator of the Punisher, a war veteran who becomes a vigilante, wearing a black costume with white skull design on his chest and wielding vast arsenal of firearms and explosives in a one-man war on crime (Amazing Spider-Man #129, 1974); of the Kingpin of Crime, a New York mob boss (Amazing Spider-Man #50, 1967); of the Kingpin's wife, Vanessa (Amazing Spider-Man #69, 1969)

Ross Andru: co-creator of the Punisher, a war veteran who becomes a vigilante, wearing a black costume with white skull design on his chest and wielding vast arsenal of firearms and explosives in a one-man war on crime (Amazing Spider-Man #129, 1974); of the Punisher maintaining safehouses (Giant-Size Spider-Man #4, 1975)

David Mazzuchelli: co-creator of Murdock wearing stubble in both of his identities (Daredevil #228, 1986); of Wilson Fisk controlling the police (Daredevil #227, 1986); of Sister Maggie, a nun who cares for Daredevil (Daredevil #229, 1986); of Sister Maggie tending to Matt after he was first blinded (Daredevil #230, 1986)

Garth Ennis: co-creator of the Punisher going up against an Irish mob, including its leader Finn (Punisher #17, 2004); of the Punisher pursuing people who killed his family from behind prison bars (Punisher: The Cell #1, 2005); of Punisher tying up Daredevil and taping a gun into his hand (Punisher #3, 2000)

Dan G. Chichester: co-creator of Daredevil wearing body armor (Daredevil #322, 1993); of Daredevil bringing down Fisk's criminal empire (Daredevil #300, 1992); of the Chaste, the name of Stick's order; of Star, one of the Chaste (Daredevil #296, 1991)

Brian Michael Bendis: co-creator of Daredevil battling the Yakuza (Daredevil #56, 2004); of Night Nurse, a medic who treats wounded super heroes such as Daredevil (Daredevil #58, 2004); of Jessica Jones, a civilian superhuman (Alias #1, 2001)

Roy Thomas: co-creator of Turk Barrett, a gangster who fights Daredevil (Daredevil #69, 1970); of the prison Ryker's Island (Daredevil #63, 1970); of Karen Page learning Matt Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #57, 1969)

Wally Wood: co-creator of Daredevil's red costume; of Daredevil's gimmick billy club which includes a cable line (Daredevil #7, 1965); of the Stilt-Man; of Matt becoming involved with Karen (Daredevil #8, 1965)

Tony DeZuniga: co-creator of Frank Castle becoming the Punisher after happening upon criminals in a park who set off a gunfight which killed his wife Maria, daughter Lisa and son Frank Jr. (Marvel Preview #2, 1975)

Steve Englehart: co-creator of Roxxon Energy, a ruthless criminal corporation (Captain America #180, 1974); of Ben Donovan, an African-American lawyer who works for criminals (Hero for Hire #14, 1973)

Alex Maleev: co-creator of Daredevil battling the Yakuza (Daredevil #56, 2004); of Night Nurse, a medic who treats wounded super heroes such as Daredevil (Daredevil #58, 2004)

Len Wein: co-creator of Blake Tower, New York district attorney frequently embroiled in Nelson & Murdock's affairs (Daredevil #124, 1975)

Marv Wolfman: co-creator of Blake Tower, New York district attorney frequently embroiled in Nelson & Murdock's affairs (Daredevil #124, 1975)

Mike Baron: co-creator of the Punisher keeping a dog at his safehouse (Punisher #54, 1991); of the Punisher's Catholicism (Punisher #30, 1990)

Lew LaRosa: o-creator of the Punisher pursuing people who killed his family from behind prison bars (Punisher: The Cell #1, 2005)

Ron Garney: co-creator of the Chaste, the name of Stick's order; of Star, one of the Chaste (Daredevil #296, 1991)

Leandro Fernandez: co-creator of the Punisher going up against an Irish mob, including its leader Finn (Punisher #17, 2004)

Mark Gruenwald: creator of Roscoe Sweeney's first name (Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Deluxe Edition #3, 1986)

Billy Graham: co-creator of Ben Donovan, an African-American lawyer who works for criminals (Hero for Hire #14, 1973)

Tom DeFalco: co-creator of the Kingpin continuing his criminal activities from his cell (Spider-Girl #1, 1998)

Ron Frenz: co-creator of the Kingpin continuing his criminal activities from his cell (Spider-Girl #1, 1998)

Sal Buscema: co-creator of Roxxon Energy, a ruthless criminal corporation (Captain America #180, 1974)

Steve Dillon: co-creator of Punisher tying up Daredevil and taping a gun into his hand (Punisher #3, 2000)

Marc Guggenheim: co-creator of Brett Mahoney, a police detective (Marvel Comics Presents #1, 2007)

Marco Checchetto: co-creator of Frank Castle as a veteran of Middle Eastern conflicts (Punisher #4, 2011)

Jim Shooter: co-creator of Hell's Kitchen as locale patroled by Daredevil (Daredevil #148, 1977)

Dave Wilkins: co-creator of Brett Mahoney, a police detective (Marvel Comics Presents #1, 2007)

Gil Kane: co-creator of Hell's Kitchen as locale patroled by Daredevil (Daredevil #148, 1977)

Dennis O'Neil: co-creator of the Punisher being sent to prison (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #15, 1981)

Greg Rucka: co-creator of Frank Castle as a veteran of Middle Eastern conflicts (Punisher #4, 2011)

J.M. DeMatteis: co-creator of Foggy Nelson learning Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #347, 1995)

John Romita, Jr.: co-creator of Matt Murdock going to regular confession (Daredevil #267, 1989)

Bill Mantlo: co-creator of the Punisher battling the Kingpin (Spectacular Spider-Man #81, 1983)

Al Milgrom: co-creator of the Punisher battling the Kingpin (Spectacular Spider-Man #81, 1983)

Lee Weeks: co-creator of Daredevil bringing down Fisk's criminal empire (Daredevil #300, 1992)

Ron Wagner: co-creator of Foggy Nelson learning Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #347, 1995)

Hugh Haynes: co-creator of the Punisher keeping a dog at his safehouse (Punisher #54, 1991)

Michael Gaydos: co-creator of Jessica Jones, a civilian superhuman (Alias #1, 2001)

Kevin Smith: co-creator of Matt Murdock wearing red-tinted sunglasses (Daredevil #1, 1998)

Joe Quesada: co-creator of Matt Murdock wearing red-tinted sunglasses (Daredevil #1, 1998)

Ann Nocenti: co-creator of Matt Murdock going to regular confession (Daredevil #267, 1989)

Bill Sienkiewicz: co-creator of the Hand worshipping a demon (Elektra: Assassin #1, 1986)

Chris Claremont: co-creator of Jeryn Hogarth, a lawyer (Marvel Premiere #24, 1975)

Pat Broderick: co-creator of Jeryn Hogarth, a lawyer (Marvel Premiere #24, 1975)

Joe Orlando: co-creator of Daredevil's ability to detect lies (Daredevil #3, 1964)

Scott McDaniel: co-creator of Daredevil wearing body armor (Daredevil #322, 1993)

Tony Isabella: co-creator of Matt Murdock's Catholicism (Daredevil #119, 1975)

Bill Reinhold: co-creator of the Punisher's Catholicism (Punisher #30, 1990)

Archie Goodwin: co-creator of Claire Temple (Hero for Hire #2, 1972)

Bob Brown: co-creator of Matt Murdock's Catholicism (Daredevil #119, 1975)

George Tuska: co-creator of Claire Temple (Hero for Hire #2, 1972)

Win Mortimer: co-creator of Night Nurse (Night Nurse #1, 1972)

Jean Thomas: co-creator of Night Nurse (Night Nurse #1, 1972)

Richard Starkings: creator of Daredevil logo (Daredevil #1, 1998)

Thursday, March 10, 2016

RIP: Paul Ryan

Comic book artist Paul Ryan has passed away. Although he laboured within the comics industry up to his death, I haven't read much about his passing, aside from those who knew him personally and a handful of fans. As most of his comics work in the 21st century was on the Phantom comic strip, he simply wasn't doing the sort of "Big Two" super hero work which creates recognition from the majority of comics fans.

Indeed, even his 80s & 90s comics work is seldom spoken of. Iron Man. Avengers. Avengers West Coast. Quasar. Squadron Supreme. Fantastic Four. They're all known names to comics fans. Why have his contributions been ignored?

Some of this is because of the style he drew in. He was a solid, dependable artist who could render uniformity among the many Marvel characters. This made him perfect for the 80s & 90s obsession with continuity - his Hulk was not grotesque like Larsen's, his Spider-Man lacked the over-sized lenses of McFarlane, his Iron Man had a more believable sense of perspective than his predecessor Romita... in short, though he laboured through times of big, flashy super hero artists, he didn't try to entice undue attention to his work. Some, I'm sure, would go further and call his style "bland."

It also didn't help that he came in on the Avengers during a very lackluster moment in that series' publishing history, serving writers John Byrne and Larry Hama - neither of whom rank anywhere close to fandom's favourite Avengers scribes. And if they do remember him, it would be as the co-creator of Rage, a character who is still ridiculed for being a street-level hero who dared, dared join the Avengers, which occasioned many an Avengers fan to drop their monocles. His Avengers West Coast has fared somewhat better, helped by having drawn a pretty neat Ultron story, but the West Coast series is itself not often brought up.

He drew the Fantastic Four every month for five years, yet while that run (with writer Tom DeFalco) has its fans, it also has its detractors. He drew the series during the age where the Thing wore a helmet, the Invisible Woman put a chest window on her uniform, Mr. Fantastic and Dr. Doom died and everyone wore drab jackets over their costumes. Of course, he also helped undo every single one of those changes before leaving the series but to outside observers his Fantastic Four has too much of the 90s about it. It smells like Nirvana.

Even his contribution to Mark Gruenwald's Squadron Supreme can be over-stressed as he was only one of three artists to work on the series. Indeed, many have said the art shake-ups have diminished the book's reputation in the long run. In total, Ryan drew 5 of the 12 issues, including the climax. But while Squadron Supreme is often called Gruenwald's greatest work, it's quietly falling into the past, a book beloved by those of its time but not appreciated by the next generation of readers.

Does it seems as though I'm trying to sound depressing? All right, let me cheer you up; let me give you a good reason to celebrate Ryan's life and legacy. I can spell it with three characters: D P 7.

Falling between their collaborations on Squadron Supreme and Quasar, Gruenwald & Ryan's DP7 is my pick for the best work of either man's career. Being a New Universe series it was largely neglected in its time and forgotten since, but I hold it to be a fine story, one which pushes against the tropes of super hero comics in that way so many 80s books tried to (be they Zot! or Marvelman).

In the New Universe, all superhuman people received their abilities from the same source, the "White Event" astrological phenomenon. Gruenwald liked this origin, calling it a "democratic" super power origin. Thus, the people who made up the cast of DP7 had not caught in some accident, been born special or subjected to weird experiments - they each simply woke up one day to find they had an odd ability they couldn't account for (and within the pages of DP7, they never do learn their origins - when one character suggests the White Event another scoffs, suggesting they might as well blame the Reagan presidency).

Although the cast of DP7 shifted around (sometimes more than 7 leads, sometimes fewer) the two characters who remained in-focus the longest were Dave Landers and Randy O'Brien. Dave was an atheist, blue collar factory worker; Randy was a Catholic physician. Dave spent much of his time hoping his "freakish" appearance wouldn't stand in the way of romance with fellow paranormal Stephanie; Randy spent a great deal of time unsure of how to respond to the advances of fellow paranormal Charlotte because she was black (he eventually received an appropriately brutal put-down for his wishy-washyness). Through it all, Dave and Randy were friends.

At one point both Dave and Randy were in the military and Dave, in despair after being sent to solitary confinement, attempted suicide; Randy saved his life. Later, Dave would return the favour by saving Randy from an erupting volcano; it's only as Dave carried Randy to safety that he realized his own drive to live and rejection of suicide had been truly reached.

DP7 also featured the antics of Philip Nolan Voigt, a paranormal with the ability to duplicate the abilities of any other paranormal he met with absolutely no drawbacks. What's a man with so much power to do with himself? Why, run for President, naturally! Only Dave and Randy were immune to Voigt's mind control powers, but as Voigt could order their friends to kill themselves with a single thought, they had no choice but to let his campaign carry him all the way to the White House.

There's so much more: Lenore, the elderly woman whose powers steadily rejuvenated her, but seemingly at the cost of becoming an addict to her own abilities; George, the hapless fellow whose body was constantly mutating into new forms; Jenny, the former armored hero Spitfire who grew her own armor after a brush with mutagenic waste; Merriam, the woman who tried to romance Dave, but always ranked second-place with him. Scuzz. Jeff. Stephanie. Charlotte. Evan. The Woodsman. Captain Manhattan.

I absorbed the whole of DP7 across one late afternoon, years after the series had already concluded. In the span of hours it took to read those 32 issues (plus one annual) I came to know and like the unfortunate cast members. Ryan drew all 32 issues and, if you do think him bland, then he was the right choice for the reasonably well-grounded stories, set in a somewhat-more mundane world without high-tech Helicarriers or tiny cities in bottles.

Rest in peace, Mr. Ryan.

Monday, March 7, 2016

Why Knock Christian Rock?

I recently sat down with a friend and watched the film version of Donald Miller's book Blue Like Jazz. I didn't expect the film to be extremely faithful to the book (the book being largely philosophical, rather than a narrative), but I'd been interested in it because of the director, Steve Taylor, who had been one of my favourite musicians in the 1990s. Subsequently, I decided to check in on what Taylor had been up to since the film wrapped and discovered he'd founded a new band: Steve Taylor and the Perfect Foil. This was quite a surprise, as Taylor hadn't recorded an album of his own for 20 years (being a director/produce/songwriter in the interim). Naturally, I bought his band's new album Goliath and over the last week I've listened to it repeatedly. It's very much in the same vein as the music he made in the 90s, and that's a good thing to me. Taylor's arch, opinionated observations about life have always struck a chord with me.

Bringing up Taylor to my brother led him to compose two blog entries related to the subject of Christian rock and his thoughts have caused me to think back on the entire phenomenon. Although I listened to a tremendous amount of Christian albums in my teen years, it's only in the last few years that I've trepidatiously returned to the genre.

It certainly helped my teenage self to see the Christian music industry as a "safe" alternative to what literally all of my peers were listening to. But like all things which have held my interest for any length of time, collection mania set in. It became about the having, not the value of the thing. I built a massive library of Christian rock albums, yet many of them received but a single audience with me before being set aside forever. It wasn't so much that I idolized the artists as I idolized the albums.

Shame of that may have played into my turning away from Christian music at the age of 20, the year in which I went to college in a new city while my family moved far to the east of the country. I broke up much of the collection before moving out and I think even the remainder (the albums I liked - notably DC Talk, Newsboys and Steve Taylor) held a modicum of shame at my old mania. I was also using the internet for the first time and had access to nonstop Old-Time Radio programs, which became my constant listening pleasure. Finally, being in college in a new city I, like so many others, wanted to develop a new identity for myself.

Part of that new identity played into my churchgoing as I deliberately turned away from the "low church" environs I'd previously preferred and into something more "high church" where the only music was traditional hymnbook with organ accompaniment. Perhaps something of secular culture had changed my thinking about Christian music; after all, non-Christians think hymnal music is, at worst, dull; but they think Christian rock is, at best, lame.

It was many years before I ventured back into a more relaxed church, the one which is my home parish today (to the extent that it was a factor in choosing where my new house would be). My church today is far less traditional than any other Anglican church I've been part of and initially the unfamiliar songs left me uneasy. But as the people - and the songs - of that church became familiar, I began to feel at home. While I can still appreciate a good hymn, I've enjoyed having a bit of Christian rock back in my life. And as I became more comfortable singing along with tunes like "My Lighthouse" (presently my favourite ditty), I began to add a few albums to my collection. I'd begun listening to music again (instrumental, either classical or film soundtracks) and found a bit of the (still-going) Newsboys or Rend Collective gave me a bit of worship time in my home.

But while the Newsboys have essentially become a worship band not too unlike the one which my able friend Rob leads, with Goliath I'm back to the sort of album I would have bought in the 90s. And while there is some nostalgia in hearing Taylor belt out tunes with his wonderfully nasal delivery, I'm finding his songs don't speak to who I was in the 90s - they speak to who I am now.

Cut down
I'm a debaser
I can't stop
It's human nature
I'm run runnin' down
Every little thing you say
'Til I get my way
-"Sympathy Vote"

It helps that Taylor has always felt free to criticize. As I said, Christian rock in the 90s was "safe." You weren't going to get exposed to harmful ideas or mores, right? But in "Smug" I heard a song about Christians with superiority complexes; in "I Want to Be a Clone" he mocked the idea of Christian conformity; and in "I Blew Up the Clinic Real Good," he dared to tackle the hypocrisy behind people bombing abortion clinics. That's what "safe" music looked like to me and it expressed the idea that it was okay to comment on the unhelpful/harmful things my fellow Christians do, rather than the "Go Team Christ!" attitude seen in most places. Taylor's music did some good things for my worldview back in my teens; I'm pleased he's still got something worth hearing.

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Ant-Man (2015) creator credits

Look at what turned up on Netflix!

Stan Lee: creator of the Tales to Astonish title (Tales to Astonish #1, 1959); co-creator of Henry Pym, a scientist who develops a chemical formula which can shrink people in size and uses this ability to interact with ants (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962); Peggy Carter, an intelligence operative (Tales of Suspense #75, 1966); S.H.I.E.L.D., an international espionage organization; Hydra, a terrorist organization opposed to S.H.I.E.L.D.; Stark involved with S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strange Tales #135, 1965); Ant-Man, the costumed identity of Henry Pym wherein he wears a protective red and black costume with size-changing capsules on his belt and wears a helmet which helps him communicate with ants; Pym receiving heightened strength by shrinking in size; Pym keeping an anthill in his laboratory in order to study the insects (Tales to Astonish #35, 1962); the Falcon, a costumed hero trained by Captain America (Captain America #117, 1969); the Wasp, Ant-Man's female sidekick and love interest adorned in a red and black costume with insect-like wings permitting flight (Tales to Astonish #44, 1963); Pym's nickname "Hank"; Ant-Man riding flying ants into battle; Ant-Man distraught when one of his flying ants dies while helping him (Tales to Astonish #47, 1963); the Avengers, a team of super heroes who include Iron Man (Avengers #1, 1963); Tony Stark, alias Iron Man, an industrialist who wears a powerful suit of armor (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); a sub-atomic universe which Ant-Man's shrinking power can access (Fantastic Four #16, 1963); Tony Stark providing the Avengers with their headquarters (Avengers #2, 1963); Stark Industries, Tony Stark's company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963); Eternity, the embodiment of the universe itself (Strange Tales #138, 1965); Spider-Man, a hero who swings around and climbs up walls (Amazing Fantasy #15, 1962); Captain America as an Avenger (Avengers #4, 1964); Ant-Man punching out of a vacuum cleaner (Tales to Astonish #37, 1962)

Jack Kirby: co-creator of Henry Pym, a scientist who develops a chemical formula which can shrink people in size and uses this ability to interact with ants (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962); Peggy Carter, an intelligence operative (Tales of Suspense #75, 1966); S.H.I.E.L.D., an international espionage organization; Hydra, a terrorist organization opposed to S.H.I.E.L.D.; Stark involved with S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strange Tales #135, 1965); Ant-Man, the costumed identity of Henry Pym wherein he wears a protective red and black costume with size-changing capsules on his belt and wears a helmet which helps him communicate with ants; Pym receiving heightened strength by shrinking in size; Pym keeping an anthill in his laboratory in order to study the insects (Tales to Astonish #35, 1962); the Wasp, Ant-Man's female sidekick and love interest adorned in a red and black costume with insect-like wings permitting flight (Tales to Astonish #44, 1963); the Avengers, a team of super heroes who include Iron Man (Avengers #1, 1963); Tony Stark, alias Iron Man, an industrialist who wears a powerful suit of armor (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); a sub-atomic universe which Ant-Man's shrinking power can access (Fantastic Four #16, 1963); Tony Stark providing the Avengers with their headquarters (Avengers #2, 1963); Stark Industries, Tony Stark's company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963); Captain America, a patriotic super hero; Bucky Barnes, Captain America's ally and best friend (Captain America Comics #1, 1941); Captain America as an Avenger (Avengers #4, 1964); Ant-Man punching out of a vacuum cleaner (Tales to Astonish #37, 1962)

Larry Lieber: co-creator of Henry Pym, a scientist who develops a chemical formula which can shrink people in size and uses this ability to interact with ants (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962); Ant-Man, the costumed identity of Henry Pym wherein he wears a protective red and black costume with size-changing capsules on his belt and wears a helmet which helps him communicate with ants; Pym receiving heightened strength by shrinking in size; Pym keeping an anthill in his laboratory in order to study the insects (Tales to Astonish #35, 1962); Tony Stark, alias Iron Man, an industrialist who wears a powerful suit of armor (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); Ant-Man punching out of a vacuum cleaner (Tales to Astonish #37, 1962)

David Michelinie: co-creator of Scott Lang, a divorced ex-convict trying to support his lovable daughter Cassie Lang; Scott stealing the Ant-Man costume and equipment from Henry Pym; Darren Cross, the criminal head of Cross Technologies; Scott Lang using the Ant-Man powers to break into Cross Technologies so he can help Cassie (Marvel Premiere #47, 1979); Pym helping to mentor Scott Lang as Ant-Man, permitting him to keep the costume (Marvel Premiere #48, 1979); the Falcon as an Avenger (Avengers #183, 1979)

John Byrne: co-creator of Scott Lang, a divorced ex-convict trying to support his lovable daughter Cassie Lang; Scott stealing the Ant-Man costume and equipment from Henry Pym; Darren Cross, the criminal head of Cross Technologies; Scott Lang using the Ant-Man powers to break into Cross Technologies so he can help Cassie (Marvel Premiere #47, 1979); Pym helping to mentor Scott Lang as Ant-Man, permitting him to keep the costume (Marvel Premiere #48, 1979); the Falcon as an Avenger (Avengers #183, 1979)

Don Heck: co-creator of Howard Stark, deceased father of Tony Stark and previous owner of Stark Industries (Iron Man #28, 1970); Pym's nickname "Hank"; Ant-Man riding flying ants into battle; Ant-Man distraught when one of his flying ants dies while helping him (Tales to Astonish #47, 1963); Tony Stark, alias Iron Man, an industrialist who wears a powerful suit of armor (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); Stark Industries, Tony Stark's company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963)

Roy Thomas: co-creator of Yellowjacket, a black and yellow costume based on Henry Pym's technology which allows the wearer to shrink in size (Avengers #59, 1968); Henry Pym marrying the Wasp (Avengers #60, 1968); Ant-Man's helmet providing environmental seals (Avengers #93, 1971); the S.H.I.E.L.D. logo, an eagle within a circle (Strange Tales #154, 1967)

H.E. Huntley: co-creator of the Wasp, Ant-Man's female sidekick and love interest adorned in a red and black costume with insect-like wings permitting flight (Tales to Astonish #44, 1963); Pym's nickname "Hank"; Ant-Man riding flying ants into battle; Ant-Man distraught when one of his flying ants dies while helping him (Tales to Astonish #47, 1963)

Archie Goodwin: co-creator of Howard Stark, deceased father of Tony Stark and previous owner of Stark Industries (Iron Man #28, 1970)

Steve Englehart: co-creator of Peggy Carter as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Captain America #169, 1974); the Falcon's mechanical wings (Captain America #170, 1974); Pym shrinking and enlarging objects, carrying some inside his pockets (West Coast Avengers #21, 1987)

Sal Buscema: co-creator of Peggy Carter as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Captain America #169, 1974); Henry Pym developing health issues from repeatedly changing size (Avengers #227, 1983); the Falcon's mechanical wings (Captain America #170, 1974)

Tom DeFalco: co-creator of Hope Pym, the embittered daughter of Henry Pym and the Wasp (A-Next #10, 1998); Ant-Man helmet with red lenses (Fantastic Four #405, 1995); Hope Pym's name; Hope using the Wasp's equipment (A-Next #12, 1998)

John Buscema: co-creator of Yellowjacket, a black and yellow costume based on Henry Pym's technology which allows the wearer to shrink in size (Avengers #59, 1968); Henry Pym marrying the Wasp (Avengers #60, 1968)

Robert Kirkman: co-creator of a militarized version of the Ant-Man technology which includes mechanical arms attached to the suit; Mitchell Carson, a thuggish S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Irredeemable Ant-Man #1, 2006)

Phil Hester: co-creator of a militarized version of the Ant-Man technology which includes mechanical arms attached to the suit; Mitchell Carson, a thuggish S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Irredeemable Ant-Man #1, 2006)

Steve Ditko: co-creator of Eternity, the embodiment of the universe itself (Strange Tales #138, 1965); Spider-Man, a hero who swings around and climbs up walls (Amazing Fantasy #15, 1962)

Geoff Johns: co-creator of Scott Lang's wife becoming involved with a police officer (Avengers #62, 2003); Ant-Man wearing a costume with increased black tones (Avengers #57, 2002)

Ron Frenz: co-creator of Hope Pym, the embittered daughter of Henry Pym and the Wasp (A-Next #10, 1998); Hope Pym's name; Hope using the Wasp's equipment (A-Next #12, 1998)

Steve Epting: co-creator of the Winter Soldier, a figure with a cybernetic arm (Captain America #1, 2005); the Winter Soldier as Bucky Barnes (Captain America #8, 2005)

Ed Brubaker: co-creator of the Winter Soldier, a figure with a cybernetic arm (Captain America #1, 2005); the Winter Soldier as Bucky Barnes (Captain America #8, 2005)

Mike Friedrich: co-creator of Peggy Carter as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Captain America #169, 1974); the Falcon's mechanical wings (Captain America #170, 1974)

Trevor Hairsine: co-creator of the Falcon wearing a military-style costume with large amounts of black; the Falcon wielding guns (Ultimate Nightmare #1, 2004)

Warren Ellis: co-creator of the Falcon wearing a military-style costume with large amounts of black; the Falcon wielding guns (Ultimate Nightmare #1, 2004)

Joe Simon: co-creator of Captain America, a patriotic super hero; Bucky Barnes, Captain America's ally and best friend (Captain America Comics #1, 1941)

Al Milgrom: co-creator of Pym shrinking and enlarging objects, carrying some inside his pockets (West Coast Avengers #21, 1987)

Roger Stern: co-creator of Henry Pym developing health issues from repeatedly changing size (Avengers #227, 1983)

Bob Harras: co-creator of Hydra being connected to S.H.I.E.L.D.'s own ranks (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #1, 1988)

Paul Neary: co-creator of Hydra being connected to S.H.I.E.L.D.'s own ranks (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #1, 1988)

Carlos Pacheco: co-creator of the Wasp wearing a black costume with a yellow chest (Avengers Forever #1, 1998)

Gene Colan: co-creator of the Falcon, a costumed hero trained by Captain America (Captain America #117, 1969)

Kurt Busiek: co-creator of the Wasp wearing a black costume with a yellow chest (Avengers Forever #1, 1998)

Gary Frank: co-creator of Scott Lang's wife becoming involved with a police officer (Avengers #62, 2003)

Jim Steranko: co-creator of the S.H.I.E.L.D. logo, an eagle within a circle (Strange Tales #154, 1967)

Kieron Dwyer: co-creator of Ant-Man wearing a costume with increased black tones (Avengers #57, 2002)

John Ostrander: co-creator of Ant-Man wearing a helmet with full face mask (Heroes for Hire #6, 1997)

Pasqual Ferry: co-creator of Ant-Man wearing a helmet with full face mask (Heroes for Hire #6, 1997)

Robert Bernstein: co-creator of Stark Industries, Tony Stark's company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963)

Neal Adams: co-creator of Ant-Man's helmet providing environmental seals (Avengers #93, 1971)

Mark Millar: co-creator of the Triskelion, a S.H.I.E.L.D. headquarters (Ultimates #1, 2002)

Bryan Hitch: co-creator of the Triskelion, a S.H.I.E.L.D. headquarters (Ultimates #1, 2002)

Gaspar Saladino: creator of the Avengers logo with enlarged letter "A" (Avengers #96, 1972)

Brian Michael Bendis: co-creator of the Wasp dying in battle (Secret Invasion #8, 2008)

Leinil Francis Yu: co-creator of the Wasp dying in battle (Secret Invasion #8, 2008)

Paul Ryan: co-creator of Ant-Man helmet with red lenses (Fantastic Four #405, 1995)

Gary Friedrich: co-creator of the Falcon's red costume (Captain America #144, 1971)

John Romita: co-creator of the Falcon's red costume (Captain America #144, 1971)