Marvel Cinematic Universe Creator Credits

This page features all of the creator credits I've gathered thus far from Marvel Cinematic Universe films & television programs, but does not include Marvel films I've covered which are not MCU. They are grouped here by creator names (last name, A-Z). As always, many assumptions are taken as to who was responsible for the original ideas presented in the comics books and I have attributed them to the original writers & pencilers, while acknowledging that inkers, letterers, colorists, editors and people not even listed in the book's credits could have played significant roles. Please notify me of errors and omissions.

The MCU films and shows I've covered thus far are:

Ant-Man (2015)

Avengers (2012)

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)

Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

Daredevil (season 1)

Daredevil (season 2)

Doctor Strange (2016)

Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2(2017)

The Incredible Hulk (2008)

Iron Fist (season 1)

Iron Man (2008)

Iron Man 2 (2010)

Iron Man 3 (2013)

Jessica Jones (season 1)

Luke Cage (season 1)

Thor (2011)

Thor: The Dark World (2013)

The non-MCU films are:

Big Hero Six

Deadpool (2016)

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (2011)

Logan

The Wolverine (2013)

X-Men: Apocalypse

X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014)

Now, on with the credits!

Jason Aaron: co-creator of Doctor Strange wearing a buttoned-down version of his blue shirt (Doctor Strange #1, 2015)

Dan Abnett & Andy Lanning: co-creators of Groot's vocabulary limited to little more than "I am Groot" (Annihilation: Conquest#2, 2008); of Rocket Raccoon sticking Groot's remains in a planter to regrow him (Annihilation: Conquest #6, 2008); of Gamora, Drax, Star-Lord, Rocket Raccoon, Mantis and Groot banded together as the Guardians of the Galaxy; the Guardians of the Galaxy on Knowhere; the Guardians of the Galaxy wearing matching uniforms; Rocket as the team's tactician; Rocket disliking Cosmo (Guardians of the Galaxy #1, 2008); of Groot's iterations of "I am Groot" having multiple meanings (Guardians of the Galaxy #17, 2009); of Knowhere, a city carved from the interior of a decapitated Celestial; Cosmo, a Soviet dog in spacesuit who dwells on Knowhere (Nova #8, 2008)

Neal Adams: co-creator of Ant-Man's helmet providing environmental seals (Avengers #93, 1971)

David Aja: co-creator of Crane Mother, a mystical entity connected to K'un-Lun (Immortal Iron Fist #4, 2007); of K'un-Lun as one of the capital cities of Heaven (Immortal Iron Fist #5, 2007); of Iron Fist being sent into a tournament against various martial artists, including The Bride of Nine Spiders (Immortal Iron Fist #8, 2007); of Daniel Rand teaching at a dojo (Immortal Iron Fist #16, 2008)

Mike Allred: co-creator of Nick Fury as an African-American man (Ultimate Marvel Team-Up #5, 2001)

Adrian Alphona: co-creator of Tina Minoru, an Asian magic user (Runaways #1, 2003)

Wellinton Alves: co-creator of Knowhere, a city carved from the interior of a decapitated Celestial; Cosmo, a Soviet dog in spacesuit who dwells on Knowhere (Nova#8, 2008); of Rafael Scarfe becoming a corrupt policeman (Shadowland: Blood on the Streets #4, 2011)

Ross Andru: co-creator of the Punisher, a war veteran who becomes a vigilante, wearing a black costume with white skull design on his chest and wielding vast arsenal of firearms and explosives in a one-man war on crime (Amazing Spider-Man #129, 1974); of the Punisher maintaining safehouses (Giant-Size Spider-Man #4, 1975)

Ruth Atkinson: co-creator of Patsy Walker, a red-headed young woman (Miss America #2, 1944)

Dick Ayers: co-creator of Hydra's origins dating back to World War 2 (Captain Savage and his Leatherneck Raiders#2, 1968); of Jacques Dernier, a member of the French Resistance who fights alongside the Howling Commandos (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #21, 1965); of Jim Morita, a World War II Nisei soldier who fought alongside the Howling Commandos (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #38, 1967); of the name Colonel Klaue (Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #39, 1967); of Batroc, a French mercenary and kickboxer who wants to test his mettle against Captain America; Agent 13, a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and love interest to Captain America; Peggy Carter, intelligence operative and wartime love interest of Captain America (Tales of Suspense#75, 1966)

Mark Bagley: co-creator of Killgrave as a rapist (Alias #25, 2003); of Howard Stark working with Captain America, Bucky and the Howling Commandos during World War II (Captain America Annual #9, 1990); of Megan McLaren, a television news broadcaster (Thunderbolts #1, 1997)

Chris Bachalo: co-creator of Doctor Strange wearing a buttoned-down version of his blue shirt (Doctor Strange #1, 2015)

Sara Barnes: co-creator of Stephen trying to write his own name after his car accident; of Stephen exhausting his personal fortune in failed operations on his hands (Strange #2, 2004); of the Ancient One wearing yellow; of the Ancient One telling Stephen to open his third eye (Strange #3, 2005); of sorcerers conjuring shields with decorative glyphs (Strange #5, 2005)

Mike Baron: co-creator of the Punisher keeping a dog at his safehouse (Punisher #54, 1991); of the Punisher's Catholicism (Punisher #30, 1990)

Brian Michael Bendis: co-creator of Jessica Jones, a cynical, alcoholic, superhumanly strong private detective who was briefly a costumed super hero, now runs Alias Investigations; Jessica Jones spying on a philandering wife then having an argument with the offended husband which causes him to knock him through her office door; Jessica meeting Luke Cage at a bar he runs then having sex with him (Alias #1, 2001); of Killgrave as a rapist (Alias #25, 2003); of Malcolm, the nearest person Jessica has to a secretary; Jessica being stalked by an adoring teenager (Alias #6, 2002); Jessica calling herself Jewel; Jessica's power of flight (Alias #12, 2002); Jessica gaining her powers in a car accident which killed her parents and brother Phil (Alias #22, 2003); of Jessica having a past with Killgrave which left her with PTSD; Killgrave's victims meeting in a support group (Alias #24, 2003); Killgrave commanding a crowd of people to inflict violence upon themselves and each other; Jessica discovering she's immune to Killgrave's powers (Alias #28, 2004); of Maria Hill working for the Avengers (Avengers #1, 2010); of Silke, a gangster (Daredevil #26, 2001); of Daredevil battling the Yakuza (Daredevil #56, 2004); of detective Angela Del Toro; the Night Nurse, a medic who treats superhumans (Daredevil #58, 2004); of the Iron Patriot, a suit of Iron Man armour repainted red, white & blue (Dark Avengers #1, 2009); of Misty Knight and Luke Cage having a romantic relationship (House of M #3, 2005); of multiple suits of Iron Man armour being operated simultaneously in combat by an artificial intelligence (Mighty Avengers #4, 2007); of the Raft, a maximum security prison for superhuman criminals (New Avengers #1, 2005); of Stark Tower, the downtown Manhattan headquarters of the Avengers (New Avengers #3, 2005); of the Falcon joining Captain America in his conflict against Iron Man (New Avengers #21, 2006); of Hawkeye joining the renegade team of Avengers who followed Captain America (New Avengers #27, 2007); of the title "Age of Ultron" (Point One #1, 2012); of the Wasp dying in battle (Secret Invasion #8, 2008); of Maria Hill, next in line to command S.H.I.E.L.D.; Nick Fury leaving S.H.I.E.L.D. to operate under deep cover (Secret War#5, 2005); of Nick Fury as an African-American man (Ultimate Marvel Team-Up #5, 2001)

Robert Bernstein: co-creator of Frigga, queen of Asgard, mother to Thor & Loki (Journey into Mystery #92, 1963); of Loki trying to usurp Odin's throne (Journey into Mystery #94, 1963); of Iron Man's armor being gold; of Iron Man's unibeam in the center of his chestplate; of Iron Man armor kept inside of briefcase; Iron Man posing as Tony Stark's employee (Tales of Suspense #40, 1963); of Pepper Potts, Tony Stark's secretary and romantic interest; Happy Hogan, a former boxer turned chauffeur and bodyguard to Tony Stark; Stark performing a test drive with a racecar which crashes; Stark Industries, Tony Stark's technology company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963); of Anton Vanko, a Russian scientist who does battle with Iron Man; Tony Stark's business under scrutiny by the Pentagon (Tales of Suspense #46, 1963)

Otto Binder: co-creator of Patsy Walker, a red-headed young woman (Miss America #2, 1944)

Jerry Bingham: co-creator of Her, the intended mate of Adam Warlock (Marvel Two-in-One #61, 1980)

Mitch Breitweiser: co-creator of Drax being held prisoner (Drax the Destroyer #1, 2005); of Drax's redesign with red body tattoos (Drax the Destroyer #3, 2006); co-creator of Drax wearing only pants; Drax preferring knives as weapons (Drax the Destroyer #4, 2006)

Dan Brereton: co-creator of the Singing Spider, an instrument of death used by the Bride of Nine Spiders (Immortal Weapons #2, 2009)

Mark Bright: co-creator of Iron Monger, a suit of armor based on Iron Man's which Obadiah Stane wears to fight Stark, leading to Stane's death; Iron Man's armour coloured red & silver; Iron Man armour with triangular unibeam (Iron Man #200, 1985); of Tony Stark's deep sea Iron Man armour (Iron Man #218, 1987); of Tony Stark's cliffside manor overlooking the ocean (Iron Man #222, 1987); of Hammer trying to obtain his own version of the Iron Man armor (Iron Man #225, 1987); of Jack Taggert, a former US soldier (Iron Man #230, 1988)

Pat Broderick: co-creator of Rafael Scarfe, a police officer (Marvel Premiere #23); of Jeryn Hogarth, a lawyer who works for Daniel Rand (Marvel Premiere #24, 1975)

Bob Brown: co-creator of Captain America's belief in God (Avengers #113, 1973); of Matt Murdock's Catholicism (Daredevil #119, 1975)

Ed Brubaker: co-creator of the Winter Soldier, a legendary Soviet assassin now on the open market, has cybernetic arm (Captain America #1, 2005); of Steve Rogers and Bucky Barnes being almost the same age; of Vasily Karpov, a Russian officer who helped program the Winter Soldier (Captain America #5, 2005); of the Winter Soldier and Captain America's fight climaxing with the reactions, "Bucky?" and "Who the Hell is Bucky?"; the Winter Soldier undergoing a memory wipe between assignments (Captain America #8, 2005); of the Winter Soldier regaining his memory and going into hiding (Captain America #14, 2006); of Peggy Carter suffering from dementia in her latter years; of Sharon as Peggy's niece (Captain America #49, 2009); of Helmut Zemo drawing out issues from Bucky Barnes' past to use against him (Captain America #606, 2010); of an elderly Peggy Carter dying in her sleep (Captain America #1, 2011); of Captain America wearing a helmet version of his mask with wings painted on the sides (Captain America: Reborn #1, 2009); of Crane Mother, a mystical entity connected to K'un-Lun (Immortal Iron Fist #4, 2007); of K'un-Lun as one of the capital cities of Heaven (Immortal Iron Fist #5, 2007); of the Iron Fist called an Immortal Weapon (Immortal Iron Fist #7, 2007); of Iron Fist being sent into a tournament against various martial artists, including The Bride of Nine Spiders (Immortal Iron Fist #8, 2007); of Captain America's modified blue/white costume with brown gloves (Secret Avengers #1, 2010); of there being multiple Winter Soldiers created in the Soviet Union (Winter Soldier #1, 2012)

Frank Brunner: co-creator of the Ancient One's title 'Sorcerer Supreme'; of the Ancient One's death (Marvel Premiere #10, 1973); of the Book of Caglistro, a tome of eldritch knowledge (Marvel Premiere #12, 1973)

Mark Buckingham: co-creator of Doctor Strange and Baron Mordo as friends (Doctor Strange #87, 1996)

Cullen Bunn: co-creator of the Singing Spider, an instrument of death used by the Bride of Nine Spiders (Immortal Weapons #2, 2009)

Carl Burgos: creator of Phineas Horton, scientist who created the Human Torch; of the Human Torch, an artificial man placed on display at a fair within a clear tube (Marvel Comics #1, 1939)

John Buscema: co-creator of Ultron, the Avengers' enemy, a robot who disguises himself in red robes and works with Klaw (Avengers #54, 1968); of the Vision, a synthetic man with red skin, green costume and yellow cape with a jewel on his forehead; Vision created by Ultron but turned against him; Vision's powers of flight and altering his density (Avengers #57, 1968); Ultron being built by one of the Avengers, but turning against him; the Vision joining the Avengers (Avengers #58, 1968); of Yellowjacket, a black and yellow costume based on Henry Pym's technology which allows the wearer to shrink in size (Avengers #59, 1968); of Henry Pym marrying the Wasp (Avengers #60, 1968); of Quinjets, the personal aircraft of the Avengers (Avengers #61, 1969); of Quicksilver wearing the colors blue and white (Avengers #75, 1970); of Cornelius Van Lunt (Avengers #77, 1970); of Van Lunt as real estate mogul (Avengers #80, 1970); of Nebula, a blue-skinned villainous space pirate (Avengers #257, 1985); of Nebula related to Thanos; Nebula attempting the destruction of Xandar (Avengers #260, 1985); of Helmut Zemo trying to destroy the Avengers as revenge for the destruction of his family, seeing them as Captain America's family (Avengers #273, 1986); of the Nova Centurions, Xandarian soldiers garbed in uniforms with chin-exposed helmets, a red starburst on their foreheads and a triangular star pattern on their chests; Dey, a Xandarian Nova Centurion; Nova Prime, title given to most powerful Nova Centurions (Nova #1, 1976); of Bruce Banner as a physician (the Savage She-Hulk#1, 1980); of Odin's ravens Hugin and Munin; of Odin's eight-legged horse Sleipnir; Odin having only one eye (Thor #274, 1978); of Gungnir, Odin's great spear (Thor#275, 1978); of Alfheim, one of the Nine Worlds (Thor#277, 1978)

Sal Buscema: co-creator of Grandmaster, a cosmic being (Avengers #69, 1969); of Cornelius Van Lunt's astrology; Nick Fury faking his death by assassination (Avengers #72, 1970); of Vision and the Scarlet Witch having feelings for each other (Avengers #91, 1971); of Henry Pym developing health issues from repeatedly changing size; of Dr. Paul Edmonds, a psychiatrist who assesses the mental status of a super hero (Avengers #227, 1983); of the Red Skull funding the creation of Hydra (Captain America #148, 1972); of Captain America reunited with a now-aged Peggy Carter; Peggy's name; Sharon Carter as a relative of Peggy (Captain America #162, 1973); of Helmut Zemo, a man whose father died during an operation involving Captain America, causing him to seek Captain America's destruction (Captain America #168, 1973); of Peggy Carter as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Captain America #169, 1974); of the Falcon wearing a pair of mechanical wings (Captain America #170, 1974); of Steve Rogers joining the army from a sense of idealism (Captain America #176, 1974); of Roxxon Energy, a ruthless criminal corporation (Captain America #180, 1974); of Captain America based out of Brooklyn; Steve Rogers' skill as an artist (Captain America #237, 1979); Luke Cage exclaiming "Sweet Christmas" as an epithet (Defenders #24, 1975); of Stakar Ogord, a space-faring hero, ally of Yondu (Defenders #27, 1975); of Aleta Ogord, Stakar's wife, a space-faring hero, ally of Yondu; of Stakar's real name (Defenders #29, 1975); of Luke Cage exclaiming "Christmas" as an epithet (Hero for Hire #11, 1973); of Ben Donovan, an African-American lawyer who works for criminals and opposes Luke Cage (Hero for Hire #14, 1973); of Rocket Racccoon as a swashbuckling hero with the moniker "Rocket;" Rocket based in the Keystone Quadrant and Halfworld; Rocket's friend Lylla (Incredible Hulk #271, 1982); of Spider-Woman, heroine Jessica Jones is based upon (Marvel Spotlight #32, 1977); of Black Widow using the alias "Rushman" (Marvel Team-Up #82, 1979); of the Nova Corps, an intergalactic force of peace officers comprising Nova Centurions (Rom #24, 1981); of Kurse, Algrim's other identity which is as powerful as Thor and garbed in red/yellow armour (Secret Wars II #4, 1985); of Grundroth, a Frost Giant who fights Thor (Thor #375, 1987); of Brahl, an extraterrestrial criminal and enemy of the Guardians of the Galaxy (Thor Annual #6, 1977)

Kurt Busiek: co-creator of Ultron assaulting an eastern European nation (Avengers #19, 1999); Ultron leading an army of similar robots into battle (Avengers #20, 1999); of the Wasp wearing a black costume with a yellow chest (Avengers Forever #1, 1998); of Tony Stark wearing a goatee (Iron Man #1, 1998); of Howard and Maria Stark's "accidental" death caused by a conspiracy (Iron Man: the Iron Age#1, 1998); of Ego's spores regrowing him on other worlds, including Earth (Maximum Security #1, 2001); of Megan McLaren, a television news broadcaster (Thunderbolts #1, 1997)

John Byrne: creator of Thor called "Odinson" (Namor the Sub-Mariner#13, 1991); of heroes carrying a bomb into Ego's brain in order to destroy him (Fantastic Four #235, 1981); co-creator of Captain America & Iron Man having a tense, argumentative relationship (Avengers #165, 1977); of the Falcon as an Avenger (Avengers #183, 1979); of Wanda and Pietro's surname Maximoff (Avengers #186, 1979); of Steve Rogers' parents dying in his teenage years (Captain America #255, 1981); of Misty Knight's background as a police officer; of Davos, a resident of K'un-Lun; of the Steel Serpent brand (Iron Fist #1, 1975); of Misty Knight as Rafael Scarfe's partner in the police; of Daniel Rand being disliked in K'un-Lun as an outsider (Iron Fist #2, 1976); of Misty Knight suffering an injury to her right arm; of Davos working with Joy Meachum (Iron Fist #3, 1976); of Iron Fist's power to heal injuries using his chi; Iron Fist using meditation to recover his strength (Iron Fist #4, 1976); of Jeryn Hogarth serving Wendell Rand in the past (Iron Fist #6, 1976); of Colleen Wing following the path of bushido and wielding a katana (Iron Fist #7, 1976); of Bambi Arbogast, Stark's secretary; of James "Rhodey" Rhodes, pilot and friend of Tony Stark (Iron Man #118, 1979); of the Mandarin being the master of the rebels who captured Tony Stark (Iron Man #269, 1991); of Tony Stark operating his armour with a headset device (Iron Man #272, 1991); of the S.H.I.E.L.D. Council seen as shadowy figures on monitors; the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier falling out of the sky (Marvel Graphic Novel #18, 1985); of Scott Lang, a divorced ex-convict trying to support his lovable daughter Cassie Lang; Scott stealing the Ant-Man costume and equipment from Henry Pym; Darren Cross, the criminal head of Cross Technologies; Scott Lang using the Ant-Man powers to break into Cross Technologies so he can help Cassie (Marvel Premiere #47, 1979); of Hank Pym helping to mentor Scott Lang as Ant-Man, permitting him to keep the costume (Marvel Premiere #48, 1979); of Star-Lord journeying through space alone on his ship (Marvel Preview #11, 1977); of Davos as Lei Kung's son (Marvel Team-Up #63, 1977); of Davos training alongside Daniel Rand to become the Iron Fist; of the Iron Fist as a title which many have held over the centuries (Marvel Team-Up #64, 1977)

Greg Capullo: co-creator of Korath the Pursuer, one of the Kree Pursuers (Quasar #32, 1992)

Mike Carey: co-creator of Ronan as a servant of Thanos (Ultimate Fantastic Four#35, 2006)

Mike Carlin: co-creator of Captain America's shield being made of Vibranium (Captain America #303, 1985)

Stefano Caselli: co-creator of the Initiative, a S.H.I.E.L.D.-led effort to control superhumans affiliated with the Avengers (Avengers: The Initiative #1, 2007)

Howard Victor Chaykin: co-creator of the Falcon joining Captain America in his conflict against Iron Man (New Avengers #21, 2006)

Marco Checchetto: co-creator of Bakuto, a member of the Hand (Daredevil #505, 2010); of Oscar Clemons, an aged police detective (Punisher #1, 2011); of Frank Castle as a veteran of Middle Eastern conflicts (Punisher #4, 2011)

Sean Chen: co-creator of Tony Stark wearing a goatee (Iron Man #1, 1998)

Dan G. Chichester: co-creator of the Chaste, the name of Stick's order; of Star, one of the Chaste (Daredevil #296, 1991); of Fisk committing murder during his childhood; of Daredevil bringing down Fisk's criminal empire (Daredevil #300, 1992); of Daredevil wearing body armor (Daredevil #322, 1993)

Frank Cho: co-creator of multiple suits of Iron Man armour being operated simultaneously in combat by an artificial intelligence (Mighty Avengers #4, 2007)

Chris Claremont: co-creator of Colleen Wing as a Daughter of the Dragon (Deadly Hands of Kung Fu #32, 1977); of the A'askavarii, an extraterrestrial race (Black Goliath#5, 1976); of Captain America based out of Brooklyn; Steve Rogers' skill as an artist (Captain America #237, 1979); of Ayesha, an alias of Her, bearing an imperious identity (Fantastic Four #11, 1998); of Misty Knight's background as a police officer; of Davos, a resident of K'un-Lun; of the Steel Serpent brand (Iron Fist #1, 1975); of Misty Knight as Rafael Scarfe's partner in the police; of Daniel Rand being disliked in K'un-Lun as an outsider (Iron Fist #2, 1976); of Misty Knight suffering an injury to her right arm; of Davos working with Joy Meachum (Iron Fist #3, 1976); of Iron Fist's power to heal injuries using his chi; Iron Fist using meditation to recover his strength (Iron Fist #4, 1976); of Jeryn Hogarth serving Wendell Rand in the past (Iron Fist #6, 1976); of Colleen Wing following the path of bushido and wielding a katana (Iron Fist #7, 1976); of Rafael Scarfe, a police officer (Marvel Premiere #23); of Jeryn Hogarth, a lawyer who works for Daniel Rand (Marvel Premiere #24, 1975); of Star-Lord journeying through space alone on his ship (Marvel Preview #11, 1977); of Davos as Lei Kung's son (Marvel Team-Up #63, 1977); of Davos training alongside Daniel Rand to become the Iron Fist; of the Iron Fist as a title which many have held over the centuries (Marvel Team-Up #64, 1977); of Black Widow using the alias "Rushman" (Marvel Team-Up #82, 1979)

Olivier Coipel: co-creator of Misty Knight and Luke Cage having a romantic relationship (House of M #3, 2005); of Thor's modified costume with chainmail sleeves and black boots (Thor #1, 2007)

Gene Colan: co-creator of Hawkeye's real name, Clint Barton (Avengers #64, 1969); of the Falcon, Sam Wilson, a costumed African-American hero who is friends with Captain America; of Redwing, the Falcon's small winged companion (Captain America #117, 1969); of Ronan depicted with blue skin; the Kree depicted with blue skin (Captain Marvel #1, 1968); of Gladiator, a costume designer who makes a Daredevil costume; Gladiator wearing body armor and wielding a saw (Daredevil #18, 1966); of Murdock using the alias "Mike" (Daredevil #25, 1967); of Karen Page learning Matt Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #57, 1969); of the prison Ryker's Island (Daredevil #63, 1970); of Turk Barrett, a gangster who fights Daredevil (Daredevil #69, 1970); of Blake Tower, New York district attorney frequently embroiled in Nelson & Murdock's affairs (Daredevil #124, 1975); of Ben Urich, an aging reporter with a relentless dedication to the truth (Daredevil #153, 1978); of Doctor Strange's Sanctum being located at 177A Bleecker Street (Doctor Strange #182, 1969); of Howard the Duck wearing pants (Howard the Duck #2, 1979); of Yondu, one of the Guardians of the Galaxy, a blue-skinned extraterrestrial with a red fin on his head; Yondu's yaka arrow, which is controlled by whistling; of Martinex, a space-faring hero with crystalline-skin, ally of Yondu; of Charlie-27, a space-faring hero with superhuman strength, ally of Yondu; a team of heroes based in space called the Guardians of the Galaxy (Marvel Super-Heroes #18, 1969); of Daniel Drumm, Haitian magic user (Strange Tales #169, 1973); of Tony Stark keeping older suits of Iron Man armour in display cases (Tales of Suspense #90, 1967); of Whiplash, a criminal with a metallic whip charged with electricity who can pierce Iron Man's armor (Tales of Suspense #97, 1968)

Gerry Conway: co-creator of the Punisher, a war veteran who becomes a vigilante, wearing a black costume with white skull design on his chest and wielding vast arsenal of firearms and explosives in a one-man war on crime (Amazing Spider-Man #129, 1974); of the Punisher maintaining safehouses (Giant-Size Spider-Man #4, 1975); of Frank Castle becoming the Punisher after happening upon criminals in a park who set off a gunfight which killed his wife Maria, daughter Lisa and son Frank Jr. (Marvel Preview #2, 1975); of Ellen Brandt, a facially-scarred woman who becomes an operative of A.I.M. (Savage Tales #1, 1971)

Denys Cowan: co-creator of the Mandarin's agents wearing a ring (Iron Man #241, 1989)

Johnny Craig: co-creator of Iron Man's armour absorbing energy (Iron Man #3, 1968)

Roger Cruz: co-creator of Killgrave surviving certain death (X-Men #34, 1998)

Peter David: co-creator of the Leader's head being round to indicate a larger brain (Incredible Hulk #342, 1988); of Bruce Banner attempting suicide but failing because the Hulk won't let him die (the Incredible Hulk #467, 1998)

Alan Davis: co-creator of Earth referred to by the number "616" (Daredevils #7, 1983)

Roberto de la Torre: co-creator of the Mandarin seeking Extremis and making an ally of Maya Hansen (Iron Man: Director of S.H.I.E.L.D. #18, 2007)

Tom DeFalco: co-creator of Hope Pym, the embittered daughter of Henry Pym and the Wasp (A-Next #10, 1998); Hope Pym's name; Hope using the Wasp's equipment (A-Next #12, 1998); of Crossbones as a Hydra agent (Captain America #24, 1999); Ant-Man helmet with red lenses (Fantastic Four #405, 1995); of the Kingpin continuing his criminal activities from his cell (Spider-Girl #1, 1998); of Captain America attempting to lift Thor's hammer (Thor #390, 1988)

Gabriele Dell'Otto: co-creator of Maria Hill, next in line to command S.H.I.E.L.D.; Nick Fury leaving S.H.I.E.L.D. to operate under deep cover (Secret War#5, 2005)

J.M. DeMatteis: co-creator of the Red Skull's name Johann Shmidt (Captain America #298, 1984); of Foggy Nelson learning Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #347, 1995); of Doctor Strange and Baron Mordo as friends (Doctor Strange #87, 1996)

Mike Deodato Jr.: co-creator of Tony Stark mentoring Peter Parker (Amazing Spider-Man #519, 2005); of romantic chemistry between Captain America and the Black Widow (Avengers #380, 1994); of the Iron Patriot, a suit of Iron Man armour repainted red, white & blue (Dark Avengers #1, 2009); of Steve Rogers' modified blue/white costume with brown gloves (Secret Avengers #1, 2010)

Tony DeZuniga: co-creator of Frank Castle becoming the Punisher after happening upon criminals in a park who set off a gunfight which killed his wife Maria, daughter Lisa and son Frank Jr. (Marvel Preview #2, 1975)

Andy Diggle: co-creator of Bakuto, a member of the Hand (Daredevil #505, 2010)

Steve Dillon: co-creator of Punisher tying up Daredevil and taping a gun into his hand (Punisher #3, 2000)

Steve Ditko: co-creator of Spider-Man, Peter Parker, a teenage super hero garbed in red and blue with a red webbing design, spider emblem on chest and lenses in his mask; Spider-Man swinging around on webbing fired from his web-shooters and climbing up walls; Spider-Man motivated to use his powers to help others; Peter's aunt May Parker, who is not aware of Peter's double life (Amazing Fantasy #15, 1962); of Spider-Man's spider-signal flashlight (Amazing Spider-Man #3, 1963); of the Wand of Watoomb, a powerful mystical staff (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #2, 1965); of Doctor Strange, a sorcerer based out of a sanctum in Greenwich Village who wages war against mystical forces of evil; Strange wearing a blue shirt and orange gloves; Doctor Strange's ally Wong; the Sanctum's window bearing a symbol with two curved lines pierced by a third line; of the Ancient One, Doctor Strange's long-lived master who is based in the east; of Doctor Strange's ability to release his astral form while his body slumbers; of Doctor Strange's golden amulet which contains a mystical eye (Strange Tales #110, 1963); of Mordo, a sorcerer dressed in green who is a former disciple of the Ancient One but is now opposed to Doctor Strange; of Hamir, a subordinate to the Ancient One; of Valtorr, a mystical entity (Strange Tales #111, 1963); of Doctor Strange wearing a magical cape (Strange Tales #114, 1963); of Stephen Strange being a gifted surgeon who cares little for his patients, then lands up in a car accident which ruins his hands, ending his medical career; Stephen becoming disshelved and withdrawn until hearing of the Ancient One and seeking that person out; Stephen discovering the Ancient One is master of magic and becoming the Ancient One's pupil; of Dormammu, a mystical entity who is opposed to the Ancient One; of Agamotto, a benevolent mystical entity (Strange Tales #115, 1963); of the Orb of Agamotto, a mystical sphere (Strange Tales #118, 1964); of Wong's name (Strange Tales #119, 1964); of sorcerers casting magical shields for defense in battle (Strange Tales #123, 1964); of Dormammu embodied as a being made of mystical flame who rules over the Dark Dimension and wishes to conquer Earth; the Dark Dimension as a realm of space with no obvious landmass (Strange Tales #126, 1964); of Doctor Strange's red Cloak of Levitation and round amulet; of Doctor Strange preventing Dormammu from invading Earth (Strange Tales #127, 1964); of Dormammu forging an alliance with a former apprentice of the Ancient One to invade Earth; of Kaecillius, a sorcerer clad in orange and blue who fights Doctor Strange and the Ancient One (Strange Tales #130, 1965); of Doctor Strange's home called a Sanctum (Strange Tales #132, 1965); of Doctor Strange's amulet being called the Eye of Agamotto; of Rama, a sorcerer aligned with Doctor Strange (Strange Tales #136, 1965); of Eternity, the embodiment of the universe itself (Strange Tales #138, 1965); of Hamir's name (Strange Tales #141, 1966); of Iron Man wearing red & gold armor (Tales of Suspense #48, 1963); of Banner transforming into the Hulk during periods of high emotional stress; of the Hulk having a savage or childlike disposition (Tales to Astonish #60, 1964); of the Leader, an intelligent man (Tales to Astonish #62, 1964); of the Leader being a gamma-irradiated man with a large head (Tales to Astonish #63, 1965); of the Hulk producing a shockwave by clapping his hands (Tales to Astonish #65, 1965)

Marko Djurdjevic: co-creator of Bor's horned helmet (Thor #7, 2008)

Arnold Drake: co-creator of Yondu, one of the Guardians of the Galaxy, a blue-skinned extraterrestrial with a red fin on his head; Yondu's yaka arrow, which is controlled by whistling; of Martinex, a space-faring hero with crystalline-skin, ally of Yondu; of Charlie-27, a space-faring hero with superhuman strength, ally of Yondu; a team of heroes based in space called the Guardians of the Galaxy (Marvel Super-Heroes#18, 1969)

Kieron Dwyer: co-creator of Ant-Man wearing a costume with increased black tones (Avengers #57, 2002); of the skin being burned off the Red Skull's face; of the Red Skull having the Super-Soldier Serum in his veins (Captain America #350, 1989); of the Avengers having a civilian support crew to maintain their base and vehicles (Captain America #352, 1989); of Crossbones, alias Brock Rumlow, a vicious thug (Captain America #359-360, 1989); of Crossbones' wrist-loaded blade weapon (Captain America #364, 1989)

Warren Ellis: co-creator of Tony Stark being injured by one of his own weapons while on tour in Afghanistan; of Stark being publicly shamed by journalists for his weapons production; of Maya Hansen, old acquaintence and lover of Tony Stark who develops Extremis, a virus which accelerates and enhances living things; Aldrich Killian, a scientist who works on the Extremis project; of Stark called a "futurist" (Iron Man #1, 2005); of the Extremis virus giving its recipients heat-based power, including flame breathing (Iron Man #2, 2005); of Iron Man armour assembling itself around Tony hands-free (Iron Man #5, 2006); of Maya Hansen knowingly assisting terrorists in acquiring Extremis (Iron Man #6, 2006); of Tony Stark injecting himself with nanomachines to interface with the Iron Man armour (Ultimate Human #1, 2008); of the Falcon wearing a military-style costume with large amounts of black and gray; the Falcon wielding guns (Ultimate Nightmare #1, 2004)

Steve Englehart: co-creator of Patsy Walker wanting to be a hero (Amazing Adventures #15, 1972); of the Black Widow as an Avenger (Avengers #111, 1973); of Mantis, a heroic Asian woman with empathic powers (Avengers #112, 1973); of Captain America's belief in God (Avengers #113, 1973); of Patsy Walker being capable in a fight; of Patsy's mother Dorothy Walker (Avengers #141, 1975); of Captain America reunited with a now-aged Peggy Carter; Peggy's name; Sharon Carter as a relative of Peggy (Captain America #162, 1973); of Peggy Carter as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Captain America #169, 1974); of the Falcon's mechanical wings (Captain America #170, 1974); of Steve Rogers joining the army from a sense of idealism (Captain America #176, 1974); of Roxxon Energy, a ruthless criminal corporation (Captain America #180, 1974); of Mariah, an African-American woman who becomes a Harlem crimelord and fights Luke Cage (Hero for Hire #5, 1973); of Luke Cage exclaiming "Christmas" as an epithet (Hero for Hire #11, 1973); of Ben Donovan, an African-American lawyer who works for criminals (Hero for Hire #14, 1973); of the Ancient One's title 'Sorcerer Supreme'; of the Ancient One's death (Marvel Premiere #10, 1973); of the Book of Caglistro, a tome of eldritch knowledge (Marvel Premiere #12, 1973); of Star-Lord, alias Peter Quill, a half-alien man orphaned at a young age who becomes a space-adventuring gun-wielding hero while searching for his origins; Meredith Quill, Peter's mother whose death leads him to discover his origins (Marvel Preview #4, 1976); of the Collector pursuing Infinity Gems (Silver Surfer #7, 1988); of Pym shrinking and enlarging objects, carrying some inside his pockets (West Coast Avengers #21, 1987)

Garth Ennis: co-creator of Punisher tying up Daredevil and taping a gun into his hand (Punisher #3, 2000); of the Punisher going up against an Irish mob, including its leader Finn (Punisher #17, 2004); of the Punisher pursuing people who killed his family from behind prison bars (Punisher: The Cell #1, 2005)

Steve Epting: co-creator of Ronan working with Korath (Avengers #346, 1992); of the Winter Soldier, a legendary Soviet assassin now on the open market, has a cybernetic arm (Captain America #1, 2005); of the Winter Soldier and Captain America's fight climaxing with the reactions, "Bucky?" and "Who the Hell is Bucky?"; the Winter Soldier undergoing a memory wipe between assignments (Captain America #8, 2005); of the Winter Soldier regaining his memory after an encounter with Captain America and going into hiding (Captain America #14, 2006)

Khari Evans: co-creator of Colleen Wing wearing a white jumpsuit (Daughters of the Dragon #1, 2006)

Bill Everett: co-creator of Matt Murdock, a lawyer who also fights crime as Daredevil by using his superhuman sensory powers; Murdock blinded as a child while saving a man from a truck carrying radioactive waste; Daredevil costume with horns on head and red eye lenses; billy club as Daredevil's primary weapon; Murdock as son of the boxer Battling Murdock, who rasied him alone and wanted him to gain a superior education; the elder Murdock dying after crossing a crooked boxing promoter and refusing to lose a fixed fight; Fogwell's Gym as Murdock's training place; Murdock partnered with his college friend Franklin "Foggy" Nelson at Nelson & Murdock law firm; Karen Page as Murdock & Nelson's secretary and object of affection to both men; Daredevil as a "man without fear" (Daredevil #1, 1964); of Kamar-Taj, the mystical base of the Ancient One in the far east; of the Ancient One as a bald person (Strange Tales #148, 1966)

Jay Faerber: co-creator of Iron Fist battling the Hand; of the Hand seeking to control Iron Fist's power (New Warriors #7, 2000)

Leandro Fernandez: co-creator of the Punisher going up against an Irish mob, including its leader Finn (Punisher #17, 2004)

Pasqual Ferry: co-creator of Luke Cage avoiding profanity because of his upbringing (Heroes for Hire #4, 1997); of Ant-Man wearing a helmet with full face mask (Heroes for Hire #6, 1997); of Ronan as a servant of Thanos (Ultimate Fantastic Four #35, 2006)

David Finch: co-creator of the Raft, a maximum security prison for superhuman criminals (New Avengers #1, 2005); of Stark Tower, the downtown Manhattan headquarters of the Avengers (New Avengers #3, 2005)

Michael Fleisher: co-creator of Jessica Drew's occupation as detective (Spider-Woman #21, 1979)

Travel Foreman: co-creator of the Iron Fist called an Immortal Weapon (Immortal Iron Fist #7, 2007); of Zhou Cheng, a martial artist who fights Iron Fist (Immortal Iron Fist #17, 2009)

Matt Fraction: co-creator of Crane Mother, a mystical entity connected to K'un-Lun (Immortal Iron Fist #4, 2007); of K'un-Lun as one of the capital cities of Heaven (Immortal Iron Fist #5, 2007); of the Iron Fist called an Immortal Weapon (Immortal Iron Fist #7, 2007); of Iron Fist being sent into a tournament against various martial artists, including The Bride of Nine Spiders (Immortal Iron Fist #8, 2007); of Daniel Rand teaching at a dojo (Immortal Iron Fist #16, 2008); of terrorists with unstable superhuman ehancements becoming human bombs (Invincible Iron Man #1, 2008); of Maria Hill leaving S.H.I.E.L.D. to work for Tony Stark (Invincible Iron Man #8, 2009); of Pepper Potts donning a suit of Iron Man armour (Invincible Iron Man #11, 2009); of Tony Stark and Pepper Potts as a couple (Invincible Iron Man #15, 2009); Iron Man armor with smaller lights across chest and large swaths of yellow (Invincible Iron Man #25, 2010)

Gary Frank: co-creator of Scott Lang's ex-wife becoming involved with a police officer (Avengers #62, 2003)

George Freeman: co-creator of Contraxians, an extraterrestrial species (Jack of Hearts #1, 1984); of Contraxia, homeworld of the Contraxians (Jack of Hearts #2, 1984)

Randall Frenz: co-creator of Howard Stark working with Captain America, Bucky and the Howling Commandos during World War II (Captain America Annual #9, 1990)

Ron Frenz: co-creator of Hope Pym, the embittered daughter of Henry Pym and the Wasp (A-Next #10, 1998); of Hope Pym's name; Hope using the Wasp's equipment (A-Next #12, 1998); of Crossbones as a Hydra agent (Captain America #24, 1999); of the Kingpin continuing his criminal activities from his cell (Spider-Girl #1, 1998); of Captain America attempting to lift Thor's hammer (Thor #390, 1988)

Gary Friedrich: co-creator of the Red Skull funding the creation of Hydra (Captain America #148, 1972); of the Falcon's red costume (Captain America #144, 1971); of A S.H.I.E.L.D.-related task force called S.T.R.I.K.E. (Captain Britain #15, 1977); of Hydra's origins dating back to World War 2 (Captain Savage and his Leatherneck Raiders #2, 1968); of Hulk's stated desire to be left alone (Incredible Hulk #102, 1968)

Mike Friedrich: co-creator of Peggy Carter as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Captain America #169, 1974); of the Falcon's mechanical wings (Captain America #170, 1974); of Thanos questing after the Cosmic Cube (Captain Marvel #27, 1973); of Thanos in love with Death (Captain Marvel #28, 1973); of Drax motivated by the deaths of his wife Yvette and daughter, which involved Thanos (Captain Marvel #32, 1974); of Drax the Destroyer, a green-skinned man with great power and singular focus on hunting his enemies to their deaths; Thanos, a death-worshipping intergalactic warlord who inflicts genocide; Drax's vendetta against Thanos (Iron Man #55, 1973); of Pepper Potts learning Tony Stark is Iron Man (Iron Man #65, 1973); of the Book of Caglistro, a tome of eldritch knowledge (Marvel Premiere #12, 1973)

Simon Furman: co-creator of Tullk, an extraterrestrial criminal (Annihilation: Ronan #1, 2006)

Steve Gan: co-creator of Star-Lord, alias Peter Quill, a half-alien man orphaned at a young age who becomes a space-adventuring gun-wielding hero while searching for his origins; Meredith Quill, Peter's mother whose death leads him to discover his origins (Marvel Preview #4, 1976)

Manuel Garcia: co-creator of James Rhodes taking Iron Man's side in his conflict against Captain America (Black Panther #22, 2007)

Ron Garney: co-creator of Tony Stark building a new costume for Spider-Man (Amazing Spider-Man #529, 2006); of an inspirational speech which quotes how one must "plant their feet and say no, you move." (Amazing Spider-Man #537, 2006); Captain America honoured with an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institute (Captain America #3, 1998); of the Chaste, the name of Stick's order; of Star, one of the Chaste (Daredevil #296, 1991)

Michael Gaydos: co-creator of Jessica Jones, a cynical, alcoholic, superhumanly strong private detective who was briefly a costumed super hero, now runs Alias Investigations; Jessica Jones spying on a philandering wife then having an argument with the offended husband which causes him to knock him through her office door; Jessica meeting Luke Cage at a bar he runs then having sex with him (Alias #1, 2001); of Malcolm, the nearest person Jessica has to a secretary; Jessica being stalked by an adoring teenager (Alias #6, 2002); Jessica calling herself Jewel; Jessica's power of flight (Alias #12, 2002); Jessica gaining her powers in a car accident which killed her parents and brother Phil (Alias #22, 2003); of Jessica having a past with Killgrave which left her with PTSD; Killgrave's victims meeting in a support group (Alias #24, 2003); of Killgrave as a rapist (Alias #25, 2003); of Killgrave commanding a crowd of people to inflict violence upon themselves and each other; Jessica discovering she's immune to Killgrave's powers (Alias #28, 2004)

Steve Gerber: co-creator of Luke Cage exclaiming "Sweet Christmas" as an epithet (Defenders #24, 1975); of Stakar Ogord, a space-faring hero, ally of Yondu (Defenders #27, 1975); of Aleta Ogord, Stakar's wife, a space-faring hero, ally of Yondu; of Stakar's real name (Defenders #29, 1975); of Howard the Duck, an anthropomorphic sardonic duck (Fear #19, 1973)

Keith Giffen: co-creator of Star-Lord building a team of agents out of a prison, including recruits Mantis, Groot and Rocket Raccoon; Groot and Rocket Raccoon's friendship; Star-Lord's helmet with full faceplate, red goggles and breathing unit; Star-Lord favouring twin guns; Rocket favouring heavy artillery; Groot termed a "Flora Colossus" (Annihilation: Conquest - Star-Lord #1, 2007); of Groot's ability to regrow himself from a single piece (Annihilation: Conquest - Star-Lord #3, 2007); of the Nova Corps operating as jailers (Annihilation Prologue #1, 2006); of Drax being held prisoner (Drax the Destroyer #1, 2005); of Drax's redesign with red body tattoos (Drax the Destroyer #3, 2006); of Drax wearing only pants; Drax preferring knives as weapons (Drax the Destroyer #4, 2006); of Rocket Raccoon, an anthropomorphic adventurous raccoon (Marvel Preview #7, 1976); of the Kyln, an extraterrestrial prison (Thanos #7, 2004); of Moloka Dar, an inmate in the Kyln; Star-Lord held as an inmate of the Kyln (Thanos #8, 2004)

Peter B. Gillis: creator of Vanaheim and Nidavellir, each of the Nine Worlds (Thor Annual #10, 1982)

Archie Goodwin: co-creator of Luke Cage, born in Georgia as Carl Lucas; Carl's childhood friendship with Willis Stryker; Stryker framing Lucas for a crime, sending Carl to the island Seagate Prison; Carl meeting criminals Shades and Comanche at Seagate and refusing to work with them; Carl being abused by the racist guard Albert Rackham; Carl being subjected to an experimental nutrient bath by Dr. Noah Burstein but being sabotaged by Rackham, causing an accident which grants Carl superhuman strength and unbreakable skin; Carl escaping Seagate, swimming to shore and adopting the name Luke Cage while he goes on the run; Luke wearing a yellow shirt and blue pants; Luke wearing a silver tiara and bracelets; of Cage haunted by the death of Reva Connors; of Luke as a Hero for Hire in Harlem; of Luke's young friend David Griffith (Hero for Hire #1, 1972); of Claire Temple, a physician who falls in love with Luke Cage; of Stryker taking the identity Diamondback and wearing a green outfit over a yellow shirt (Hero for Hire #2, 1972); of Luke Cage exclaiming "Sweet Sister" as an epithet (Hero for Hire #4, 1972); of Iron Man's armour absorbing energy (Iron Man #3, 1968); of Tony Stark undergoing surgery to have the shrapnel removed from his heart (Iron Man #19, 1969); of Howard Stark, deceased father of Tony Stark and previous owner of Stark Industries (Iron Man #28, 1970); of Spider-Woman, heroine Jessica Jones is based upon (Marvel Spotlight #32, 1977)

Billy Graham: co-creator of Luke Cage exclaiming "Sweet Sister" as an epithet (Hero for Hire #4, 1972); of Ben Donovan, an African-American lawyer who works for criminals (Hero for Hire #14, 1973)

Adi Granov: creator of Iron Man armor design (Iron Man #75, 2004); Iron Man punching the ground in a dramatic stance (Iron Man #76, 2004); co-creator of Tony Stark being injured by one of his own weapons while on tour in Afghanistan; of Stark being publicly shamed by journalists for his weapons production; Maya Hansen, old acquaintence and lover of Tony Stark who develops Extremis, a virus which accelerates and enhances living things; Aldrich Killian, a scientist who works on the Extremis project; of Stark called a "futurist" (Iron Man #1, 2005); of the Extremis virus giving its recipients heat-based power, including flame breathing (Iron Man #2, 2005); of Iron Man armour assembling itself around Tony hands-free (Iron Man #5, 2006); of Maya Hansen knowingly assisting terrorists in acquiring Extremis (Iron Man #6, 2006)

Keron Grant: co-creator of Ultron recreating itself from within Iron Man's armor (Iron Man #47, 2001)

Steven Grant: co-creator of Wanda and Pietro's surname Maximoff (Avengers #186, 1979); of Patsy Walker having comics books based on her life as created by her mother (Defenders #89, 1980)

Justin Gray: co-creator of Colleen Wing wearing a white jumpsuit (Daughters of the Dragon #1, 2006)

Devin Grayson: co-creator of the Red Room, the spy program which created the Black Widow (Black Widow #2, 1999)

Randall Green: co-creator of the red widow icon on Black Widow's belt (Journey into Mystery #517, 1998)

Timothy Green II: co-creator of Star-Lord building a team of agents out of a prison, including recruits Mantis, Groot and Rocket Raccoon; Groot and Rocket Raccoon's friendship; Star-Lord's helmet with full faceplate, red goggles and breathing unit; Star-Lord favouring twin guns; Rocket favouring heavy artillery; Groot termed a "Flora Colossus" (Annihilation: Conquest - Star-Lord#1, 2007); of Groot's ability to regrow himself from a single piece (Annihilation: Conquest - Star-Lord#3, 2007)

Mike Grell: creator of Iron Man's identity as Tony Stark being public knowledge (Iron Man #55, 2002); co-creator of Friday, an artificial intelligence used by Iron Man which has a feminine personality (Iron Man #53, 2002)

Mark Gruenwald: creator of Tony Stark running a charitable foundation through the Avengers (Avengers Annual #11, 1981); of Hawkeye's modular design arrows (Hawkeye#1, 1983); of Hawkeye's archery gloves (Hawkeye #2, 1983); of the Abomination's name Emil Blonsky (Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe #1, 1983); of the Collector's real name Taneleer Tivan; Batroc's first name Georges (Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe #3, 1983); of Leland Owsley's name (Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe #8, 1983); of Roscoe Sweeney's first name (Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Deluxe Edition #3, 1986); of Yondu Odonta's surname (Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Deluxe Edition#5, 1986); of Tony Stark identifying his armours with a "mark" system (the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Deluxe Edition #6, 1985); co-creator co-creator of Wanda and Pietro's surname Maximoff (Avengers #186, 1979); of Saal, a Xandarian Nova Centurion (Avengers #301, 1989); of the US government asserting its ownership of Captain America's costume and shield (Captain America #332, 1987); of the skin being burned off the Red Skull's face; of the Red Skull having the Super-Soldier Serum in his veins (Captain America #350, 1989); the Avengers having a civilian support crew to maintain their base and vehicles (Captain America #352, 1989); of Crossbones, alias Brock Rumlow, a vicious thug (Captain America #359 & 360, 1989); of Crossbones' wrist-loaded blade weapon (Captain America #364, 1989); of Brock Rumlow's name (Captain America #400, 1992); of Crossbones being facially disfigured under his mask (Captain America #407, 1992); of Patsy Walker having comics books based on her life as created by her mother (Defenders #89, 1980); of Her, the intended mate of Adam Warlock (Marvel Two-in-One #61, 1980); of Korath the Pursuer, one of the Kree Pursuers (Quasar #32, 1992); of deceased Asgardians being set to sea aboard ships, then cremated (Thor Annual #10, 1982)

Tom Grummett: co-creator of Helmut Zemo taking advantage of the animosity between Captain America and Iron Man so he can manipulate them to his own ends (Thunderbolts #105, 2006)

Marc Guggenheim: co-creator of Brett Mahoney, a police detective (Marvel Comics Presents #1, 2007)

Jackson Guice: co-creator of Helmut Zemo drawing out issues from Bucky Barnes' past to use against him (Captain America #606, 2010); of Black Widow's ballerina training (Solo Avengers #7, 1988); of there being multiple Winter Soldiers created in the Soviet Union (Winter Soldier #1, 2012)

Paul Gulacy: co-creator of the Black Widow wielding handguns (Bizarre Adventures #25, 1981); of Eric Savin, a former soldier with superhuman abilities (Marvel Comics Presents #26, 1989)

Trevor Hairsine: co-creator of the Falcon wearing a military-style costume with large amounts of black and gray; the Falcon wielding guns (Ultimate Nightmare #1, 2004)

Bob Hall: co-creator of Vision wearing casual clothing (Avengers #254, 1985); of Saal, a Xandarian Nova Centurion (Avengers #301, 1989); of deceased Asgardians being set to sea aboard ships, then cremated (Thor Annual #10, 1982); of James Rhodes as one of the Avengers (West Coast Avengers #1, 1984)

Larry Hama: co-creator of the Avengers being responsible to the United Nations (Avengers #329, 1991); of Daniel Rand fighting the dragon Shou-Lao the Undying, an immortal dragon, and received a dragon-shaped brand on his chest from the dragon along with the power of the Iron Fist; Lei Kung the Thunderer, Daniel's K'un-Lun mentor in the martial arts; of the Thunderer's insignia; of Daniel leaving K'un-Lun to return to New York and seek his parents' killer, Harold Meachum; of Scythe, an assassin who battles Iron Fist (Marvel Premiere #16, 1974); of Harold Meachum suffering from ill health after killing Iron Fist's parents; of Joy Meachum, Harold's daughter; of Iron Fist battling ninjas (Marvel Premiere #18, 1974); of Ward Meachum, a relative of Harold and Joy who bears a grudge against Iron Fist and hires men to attack him; of Colleen Wing, a Japanese woman, ally and sometimes love interest of Iron Fist (Marvel Premiere #19, 1974)

Ed Hannigan: co-creator of Patsy Walker having comics books based on her life as created by her mother (Defenders #89, 1980)

Bob Harras: co-creator of Ronan working with Korath (Avengers #346, 1992); of romantic chemistry between Captain America and the Black Widow (Avengers #380, 1994); of S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Jack Rollins; Hydra taking over S.H.I.E.L.D. from within, including control over its council; Jasper Sitwell allying with the conspiracy (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #1, 1988); of Alexander Pierce, close associate of Nick Fury, S.H.I.E.L.D. operative (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #3, 1988); of S.H.I.E.L.D. exposed as rife with internal corruption and dismantled (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #6, 1988)

Al Hartley: co-creator of Odin disapproving of Thor's feelings for Jane Foster (Journey into Mystery #90, 1963)

Hugh Haynes: co-creator of the Punisher keeping a dog at his safehouse (Punisher #54, 1991)

Russ Heath: co-creator of Zhou Cheng, a martial artist who fights Iron Fist (Immortal Iron Fist #17, 2009)

Don Heck: co-creator of Quicksilver and Hawkeye not getting along with each other (Avengers #17, 1965); of the Collector, a white-haired extraterrestrial who collects rare items, including sentient people (Avengers #28, 1966); of Black Widow being redeemed and rescued by Hawkeye (Avengers #30, 1966); of the Black Widow as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Avengers #38, 1967); of the Black Widow as an Avenger (Avengers #111, 1973); of Mantis, a heroic Asian woman with empathic powers (Avengers #112, 1973); of Howard Stark, deceased father of Tony Stark and previous owner of Stark Industries (Iron Man #28, 1970); of A.I.M., Advanced Idea Mechanics, a cabal of scientists with designs on ruling the Earth (Strange Tales#146, 1966); of Tony Stark, a wealthy industrialist and designer of weapons for the US Army who goes on a field tour with the army in which he is near-fatally wounded, receiving shrapnel in his heart; Stark captured by rebels and forced to design weapons for them alongside Ho Yinsen, but instead designing a gray suit of Iron Man armor to save Tony's life and enable him to escape via superhuman strength, flight and special weapons; Yinsen dying to give Iron Man time to power up, Iron Man fighting his way out of the rebels' clutches (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); of Pepper Potts, Tony Stark's secretary and romantic interest; Happy Hogan, a former boxer turned chauffeur and bodyguard to Tony Stark; Stark performing a test drive with a racecar which crashes; Stark Industries, Tony's company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963); of Anton Vanko, a Russian scientist who does battle with Iron Man; Tony Stark's business under scrutiny by the Pentagon (Tales of Suspense #46, 1963); of the Mandarin, a warlord and terrorist leader, ideological opponent of Tony Stark, wears ten rings (Tales of Suspense #50, 1964) of the Black Widow, alias Natasha Romanoff, a Russian spy, originally a KGB agent (Tales of Suspense #52, 1964); of Hawkeye, an expert archer with a variety of trick arrows such as those with explosive tips; Hawkeye having a close relationship with the Black Widow; Iron Man's repulsor ray weapon (Tales of Suspense #57, 1964); of the Black Widow's Widow's Line device (Tales of Suspense #64, 1965); of Kraglin, an extraterrestrial criminal (Tales to Astonish #46, 1963); of Pym's nickname "Hank"; Ant-Man riding flying ants into battle; Ant-Man distraught when one of his flying ants dies while helping him (Tales to Astonish #47, 1963)

Jason Henderson: co-creator of Colleen Wing as a member of the Hand (Shadowland: Daughters of the Shadow #1, 2010); of Colleen leaving the Hand (Shadowland: Daughters of the Shadow #3, 2010)

Phil Hester: co-creator of a militarized version of the Ant-Man technology which includes mechanical arms attached to the suit; Mitchell Carson, a thuggish S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Irredeemable Ant-Man #1, 2006)

Bryan Hitch: co-creator of Captain America wearing a helmet version of his mask with wings painted on the sides (Captain America: Reborn #1, 2009); of the title "Age of Ultron" (Point One #1, 2012); of Captain America skydiving without a parachute; the Triskelion, S.H.I.E.L.D. Headquarters; Captain America wearing a pseudo-military version of his costume; of Captain America being found in present times by S.H.I.E.L.D. (Ultimates #1, 2002); of S.H.I.E.L.D. creating a simulation of the 1940s to help Captain America adjust to the present but being quickly found out; Nick Fury depicted as Samuel L. Jackson with visible scars around his left eye; the Avengers as a team organized and run by S.H.I.E.L.D. under Fury's guidance; the Hulk resulting from an attempt to recreate Captain America; Iron Man's eyes & unibeam glowing light blue; S.H.I.E.L.D. presenting a new costume to Captain America after his revival (Ultimates#2, 2002); of Thor's claims of godhood being doubted by those who know him on Earth (Ultimates #4, 2002); of Hawkeye's sleeveless costume; Hawkeye and Black Widow as S.H.I.E.L.D. agents who joined the Avengers (Ultimates #7, 2002); of the Chitauri, an extraterrestrial army who battle the Avengers (Ultimates #8, 2002); of Hawkeye married to a woman named Laura with three children (Ultimates 2 #2, 2005); of the Abomination being massive and partially armored (Ultimates 2 #9, 2006)

Dave Hoover: co-creator of the name Klaue being related to Klaw (Fantastic Four Unlimited #1, 1993)

Kevin Hopgood: co-creator of the War Machine armor, a suit of Iron Man armor colored silver and grey and outfitted with heavy weaponry, including a shoulder-mounted canon (Iron Man #281, 1992); of the War Machine armor being worn by James Rhodes with a unibeam designed for its chest (Iron Man #284, 1992); of Howard and Maria Stark dying in a car accident (Iron Man #288, 1993); of Tony Stark as a child prodigy; of Howard Stark being emotionally distant from Tony (Iron Man #286, 1992); of an army of Iron Men called "the Iron Legion" (Iron Man #300, 1994); of Iron Man using modular attachments to his armor to create a larger suit better able to fight the Hulk (Iron Man #304, 1994)

Reginald Hudlin: co-creator of James Rhodes taking Iron Man's side in his conflict against Captain America (Black Panther #22, 2007); of Black Panther changing from a moderate position in Iron Man's conflict against Captain America before finally taking Captain America's side (Black Panther #23, 2007)

H.E. Huntley: co-creator of the Wasp, Ant-Man's female sidekick and love interest adorned in a red and black costume with insect-like wings permitting flight (Tales to Astonish #44, 1963); of Kraglin, an extraterrestrial criminal (Tales to Astonish#46, 1963); Pym's nickname "Hank"; Ant-Man riding flying ants into battle; Ant-Man distraught when one of his flying ants dies while helping him (Tales to Astonish #47, 1963)

Jamal Igle: co-creator of Iron Fist battling the Hand; of the Hand seeking to control Iron Fist's power (New Warriors #7, 2000)

Carmine Infantino: co-creator of Spider-Woman's Jessica Drew identity (Spider-Woman #1, 1978)

Tony Isabella: co-creator of Helmut Zemo, a man whose father died during an operation involving Captain America, causing him to seek Captain America's destruction (Captain America #168, 1973); of Matt Murdock's Catholicism (Daredevil #119, 1975); of Misty Knight, an African-American detective (Marvel Premiere #21, 1975); of Cornell Cottonmouth, a Harlem crimelord who trafficks in narcotics and fights Luke Cage; of Cottonmouth knowing Cage to be innocent of his crimes; Cottonmouth trying to get Cage to work for him (Power Man #19, 1974)

Paul Jenkins: co-creator of Iron Man developing a prison to contain super heroes who refused to submit to the US government's oversight laws (Civil War: Frontline #5, 2006)

Geoff Johns: co-creator of Ant-Man wearing a costume with increased black tones (Avengers #57, 2002); of Scott Lang's ex-wife becoming involved with a police officer (Avengers #62, 2003)

Antony Johnston: co-creator of Bakuto, a member of the Hand (Daredevil #505, 2010); of Rafael Scarfe becoming a corrupt policeman (Shadowland: Blood on the Streets #4, 2011)

Arvell Jones: co-creator of Misty Knight, an African-American detective (Marvel Premiere #21, 1975)

Bruce Jones: co-creator of Banner using the online alias "Mr. Green" for correspondence with a mysterious figure known only as "Mr. Blue"; of Banner using meditation techniques to calm himself (Incredible Hulk #34, 2002); of Sterns trying to obtain Banner's blood for his experiments (Incredible Hulk #36, 2002)

J.G. Jones: co-creator of the Red Room, the spy program which created the Black Widow (Black Widow #2, 1999)

Dan Jurgens: co-creator of Loki impersonating Odin to claim the throne of Asgard (Thor #16, 1999)

Len Kaminski: co-creator of the War Machine armor, a suit of Iron Man armor colored silver and grey and outfitted with heavy weaponry, including a shoulder-mounted canon (Iron Man #281, 1992); of the War Machine armor being worn by James Rhodes with a unibeam designed for its chest (Iron Man #284, 1992); of Tony Stark as a child prodigy; of Howard Stark being emotionally distant from Tony (Iron Man #286, 1992); of Howard and Maria Stark dying in a car accident (Iron Man #288, 1993); of Iron Man using an artificial intelligence to design his armors (Iron Man #298, 1993); of an army of Iron Men called "the Iron Legion" (Iron Man #300, 1994); of Iron Man using modular attachments to his armor to create a larger suit better able to fight the Hulk (Iron Man #304, 1994); of a vast array of Iron Man armours being kept within a secret bunker (Iron Man #318, 1995)

Gil Kane: co-creator of Hell's Kitchen as locale patroled by Daredevil (Daredevil #148, 1977); of the Soul Gem, from which the Infinty Gems were derived; of Him's alias Adam Warock (Marvel Premiere#1, 1970); of Iron Fist, alias Daniel Rand, orphaned at the age of ten and raised in the city of K'un-Lun, where he trained in the martial arts to become their greatest warrior, passing every test and trial before him until gaining the power to channel his chi into his fist, making it superhumanly powerful; Iron Fist called a "living weapon"; Wendell Rand and Heather Rand, Daniel's parents who perished nearby K'un-Lun; Harold Meachum, Wendell's business partner who betrayed him and had Wendell and Heather killed; K'un-Lun, a hidden city found in the Himalayas which exists within another dimension and only connects to Earth at intervals spaced years apart (Marvel Premiere #15, 1974); of "Hulk smash" quote (Tales to Astonish #88, 1967); of the Abomination, a Russian man exposed to gamma rays which transform him into a monstrous creature who fights the Hulk (Tales to Astonish #90, 1967)

Terry Kavanagh: co-creator of Killgrave surviving certain death (X-Men #34, 1998)

Jack Kirby: creator of creator of Arnim Zola, a scientist who performs genetic experiments on people; Zola surviving the death of his body by creating an artificial consciousness (Captain America #208, 1977); of Zola being a Swiss scientist who allied with Nazi Germany (Captain America #209, 1977); of Zola working with the Red Skull (Captain America #210, 1977); of the Celestials, immense intergalactic creatures who judge worlds (Eternals #1, 1976); of Jemiah, one of the Celestials (Eternals #7, 1977); of the Celestial Eson (Eternals #9, 1977); co-creator of the Avengers, a team of super heroes including Thor, Hulk & Iron Man, banded together as "Earth's Mightiest Heroes" because of the instigation of Loki, who plans to turn the heroes against the Hulk (Avengers #1, 1963); of Tony Stark providing the Avengers with their headquarters; of Limbo, an alien dimension (Avengers #2, 1963); of Hulk battling Thor and attempting to lift Mjolnir (Avengers #3, 1964) and Journey into Mystery #112, 1965); of Captain America frozen in ice during World War 2, revived in contemporary times, has difficulty adjusting; Bucky's seeming death during the War; Captain America joining the Avengers alongside Thor and Iron Man (Avengers #4, 1964); of Captain America throwing his shield so that it ricochets and returns to his hand (Avengers #5, 1964); of Captain America using a device to return his shield to his hand; of Zemo, an enemy to Captain America and the Avengers (Avengers #6, 1964); of Hawkeye, Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch as members of the Avengers; Captain America as the Avengers leader who notably leads the aforementioned trio together (Avengers #16, 1965); of Steve Rogers lying on his application papers in hopes of joining the army; of the vita-ray treatment which helps activate the Super-Soldier Serum; of the Nazi spy's name Heinz Kruger; of officer General Phillips' name (Captain America #109, 1969); of Captain America, Steve Rogers, a thin and weak young man who is the chief experiment of Operation: Rebirth, injecting him with the Super-Soldier Serum which makes him a perfect specimen of humanity; of the scientist who creates the serum and is assassinated by a Nazi spy; of the US military officer who oversees Operation: Rebirth; of Operation: Rebirth hidden base beneath a shop with an old woman standing guard above; of Captain America's red, white and blue costume with 'A' on forehead and stars & stripes on his chest; of James Buchanan "Bucky" Barnes, Steve's friend and partner who joins him in battle; of Captain America's triangular red, white & blue shield; of Sgt. Duffy, Steve's drill sergeant; of Camp Lehigh, the location Steve drills at; of Captain America punching Hitler in the face; of the Red Skull, a Nazi agent who battles Captain America and Bucky (Captain America Comics #1, 1941); of Captain America's round, red and white shield with star in its center; Captain America's mask fastened to his costume (Captain America Comics #2, 1941); of the Red Skull being German (Captain America Comics #7, 1941); of the Skrulls, extraterrestrial invaders from whom the Chitauri were derived (Fantastic Four #2, 1962); of the Watchers, extraterrestrials who observe the transpirings about the universe without interference (Fantastic Four #13, 1963); of a sub-atomic universe which Ant-Man's shrinking power can access (Fantastic Four #16, 1963); of Wakanda, a remote African nation largely cut off from outsiders; T'Challa, king of Wakanda, a man with cat-like senses who wears the masked identity of the Black Panther (Fantastic Four #52, 1966); of Vibranium, a rare metal found in Wakanda with unusual, unpredictable properties; King T'Chaka, the aged father of T'Challa and king of Wakanda until he was murdered; of the Wakandans worshiping black panthers; Klaw, a mercenary; Klaw invading Wakanda to obtain Vibranium; Klaw losing one of his hands (Fantastic Four #53, 1966); of the giant statues of black panthers which adorn Wakanda (Fantastic Four #54, 1966); of the Kree, an extraterrestrial race of conquerors (Fantastic Four #64, 1967); of Ronan the Accuser, a Kree who wields the hammer-like Universal Weapon (Fantastic Four #65, 1967); of Him, a gold-skinned artificial being who emerges from a coccoon (Fantastic Four #66, 1967); of the Hulk, Bruce Banner, a physicist who transforms into a massive, brutish creature with superhuman strength after exposure to gamma radiation; Banner and/or the Hulk wearing the colour purple; the Hulk describing others as "puny"; General Thaddeus Ross, a military officer who formerly employed Bruce Banner and becomes an enemy of the Hulk; Betty Ross, daughter of General Ross and love interest of Bruce; Rick Jones, a young man who befriends the Hulk (Incredible Hulk #1, 1962); of the Hulk having green skin (Incredible Hulk #2, 1962); of the Hulk traveling vast distances by leaping (Incredible Hulk #3, 1962); of Thor, Asgardian god of thunder whose hammer Mjolnir can control weather and has a worthiness enchantment which prevents others from lifting it; Thor's silver helmet, red cape and blue bodysuit with discs on his chest; Thor using the mortal alias of Donald Blake; Thor battling extraterrestrials made of stone (Journey into Mystery #83, 1962); of Jane Foster, Thor's mortal love interest (Journey into Mystery #84, 1962); of Loki, Thor's evil brother who possesses the power to cast illusions and wears green/yellow; Asgard, home of the Norse Gods which connects to Earth via the rainbow bridge Bifrost; Heimdall, guardian of Bifrost; Odin, father of Loki & Thor (Journey into Mystery#85, 1962); of Loki being placed on trial in Asgard; Loki's power of mind control (Journey into Mystery #88, 1963); of Odin's cape fastened to his armour with two fasteners on his shoulders (Journey into Mystery#89, 1963); of Bor, father of Odin, grandfather of Thor; the Frost Giants, creatures from the Nine Worlds; Muspelheim, one of the Nine Worlds; Yggdrasil, the world-tree which envelopes the Nine Worlds; of Odin's title "All-Father" (Journey into Mystery#97, 1963); of the Asgardians and Frost Giants going to war with each other (Journey into Mystery #98, 1963); of Sif, female Asgardian warrior, love interest to Thor; Niffleheim, one of the Nine Worlds (Journey into Mystery #102, 1964); of Asgardians piloting sky ships (Journey into Mystery #103, 1964); of Laufey, Loki's father, a giant; of Jotunheim, land of the giants; of Odin adopting Loki as Thor's foster brother (Journey into Mystery #112, 1965); of Thor and Loki being friends in their youth (Journey into Mystery #113, 1965); of "Crusher" Creel (Journey into Mystery #114, 1965); of the Destroyer, a massively powerful suit of automated armor built by Odin with destructive energy blasts emitted from its face and which battles Thor (Journey into Mystery #118, 1965); of Volstagg, a red-haired, overweight and jovial Asgardian warrior with a wife and several children; Hogun, a mostly-silent grim-faced and dark-haired Asgardian; and Fandral, a blond-haired dashing, adventurous Asgardian clad in green (Journey into Mystery #119, 1965); of Loki seeking to rule Asgard; Asgard possessing advanced technology (Journey into Mystery #120, 1965); of the Vision, a green-garbed man in a cape (Marvel Mystery Comics #13, 1940); of Nick Fury, an experienced soldier; of Dum-Dum Dugan, one of the Howling Commandos who wears a derby hat; of Gabe Jones, an African-American soldier in the Howling Commandos; of the Howling Commandos, a World War II unit; of the Howlers' battle cry "wa-hoo!" (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #1, 1963); of Baron Wolfgang von Strucker, nemesis of Nick Fury (Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #5, 1964); of Captain America and Bucky working alongside the Howling Commandos (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #13, 1964); of S.H.I.E.L.D., an international espionage agency, headed by a council and directed by Nick Fury; Nick Fury wearing an eye-patch; the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier, their mobile headquarters designed like a flying battleship; Life Model Decoys; the enemy secret society group Hydra; the "Hail Hydra" salute and gesture; S.H.I.E.L.D. flying cars; Tony Stark allied with S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strange Tales #135, 1965); of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents dressed in blue jumpsuits (Strange Tales#139, 1965); of Jasper Sitwell, a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Strange Tales #144, 1966); of A.I.M., Advanced Idea Mechanics, a cabal of scientists with designs on ruling the Earth (Strange Tales #146, 1966); of the Hydra insignia, a skull atop octopus arms (Strange Tales #151, 1966); of Tony Stark, a wealthy industrialist and designer of weapons for the US Army who goes on a field tour with the army in which he is near-fatally wounded, receiving shrapnel in his heart; Stark captured by rebels and forced to design weapons for them alongside Ho Yinsen, but instead designing a gray suit of Iron Man armor to save Tony's life and enable him to escape; Yinsen dying to give Iron Man time to power up, Iron Man fighting his way out of the rebels' clutches (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); of Iron Man posing as Tony Stark's employee; of Iron Man wearing gold armor; unibeam in the center of Iron Man's armor (Tales of Suspense #40, 1963); of Iron Man's armour coloured red & gold (Tales of Suspense #48, 1963); of the Mandarin, a warlord and terrorist leader, ideological opponent of Tony Stark, wears ten rings (Tales of Suspense #50, 1964); of the Black Widow, Natasha Romanoff, a spy who encounters Iron Man (Tales of Suspense #52, 1964); of Jarvis, an entity who serves Tony Stark (Tales of Suspense #59, 1964); of the Super-Soldier Serum's creator being named Abraham Erskine (Tales of Suspense #63, 1965); of Batroc, a French mercenary and kickboxer who wants to test his mettle against Captain America; Agent 13, a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and love interest to Captain America; Peggy Carter, intelligence operative and wartime love interest of Captain America (Tales of Suspense#75, 1966); of Captain America's sometimes-strained relationship with Nick Fury and good standing within S.H.I.E.L.D. (Tales of Suspense #78, 1966); of the Cosmic Cube, a massively powerful artifact which the Red Skull seeks to control (Tales of Suspense #79, 1966); of the Red Skull plotting a bombing assault near the end of World War II (Tales of Suspense #80, 1966); of Captain America's shield being indestructible; of A.I.M.'s leader having "a huge brain" (M.O.D.O.K. in Tales of Suspense #93, 1967); of Agent 13's real name Sharon Carter; Captain America romantically involved with Sharon (Tales of Suspense #95, 1967); of Black Panther meeting Captain America during a struggle against Zemo and ultimately becoming his ally (Tales of Suspense #97, 1968); of Groot, an immense tree-like being from Planet X (Tales to Astonish #13, 1960); of Henry Pym, a scientist who develops a chemical formula which can shrink people in size and uses this ability to interact with ants (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962); of Ant-Man, the costumed identity of Henry Pym wherein he wears a protective red and black costume with size-changing capsules on his belt and wears a helmet which helps him communicate with ants; Pym receiving heightened strength by shrinking in size; Pym keeping an anthill in his laboratory in order to study the insects (Tales to Astonish #35, 1962); of Ant-Man punching his way out of a vacuum cleaner (Tales to Astonish #37, 1962); of the Wasp, Ant-Man's female sidekick and love interest adorned in a red and black costume with insect-like wings permitting flight (Tales to Astonish #44, 1963); of Ant-Man modifying his powers to increase his size, transforming himself into an enormous, super-strong Giant-Man (Tales to Astonish #49, 1963); of Banner's identity as the Hulk becoming public knowledge, forcing Banner to give up his normal life and live as a fugitive from General Ross and others (Tales to Astonish #77, 1966); of Earth referred to as Midgard by Asgardians (Thor #126, 1966); of the Warlock's Eye, a mystical artifact in Odin's custody (Thor #129, 1966); of Ego, the living planet, a massive creature in the form of a planet with a face etched upon its surface; Ego destroying all other life within a galaxy (Thor #132, 1966); Ego having complete control over the environment on his surface, manufacturing bodies and tentacles for himself (Thor #133, 1966); of Odin preferring Sif for Thor; Sif being a raven tressed and red/white clad Asgardian warrior; Jane Foster visiting Asgard (Thor#136, 1967); of Thor being sent to Earth as punishment by Odin to teach him humility after a clash with Frost Giants (Thor #159, 1968); of Hel, one of the Nine Worlds (Thor #176, 1970); of people with powers called "gifted" (X-Men #1, 1963); of Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch, twins Wanda and Pietro from eastern Europe; Pietro's power of superhuman speed, Wanda's vaguely-defined powers (X-Men #4, 1964);

Robert Kirkman: co-creator of a militarized version of the Ant-Man technology which includes mechanical arms attached to the suit; Mitchell Carson, a thuggish S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Irredeemable Ant-Man #1, 2006)

Barry Kitson: co-creator of the deaths of Howard and Maria Stark in an auto accident (Iron Man #288, 1993)

David & Charles Knauf: co-creators of Iron Man creating a defense program with his armors which someone else seizes control over (Iron Man #11, 2006); of the Mandarin seeking Extremis and making an ally of Maya Hansen (Iron Man: Director of S.H.I.E.L.D. #18, 2007)

Kevin Kobasic: co-creator of Crossbones being facially disfigured under his mask (Captain America #407, 1992)

Scott Kolins: co-creator of the Nova Corps operating as jailers (Annihilation Prologue #1, 2006)

David Anthony Kraft: co-creator of Patsy Walker having comics books based on her life as created by her mother (Defenders #89, 1980)

Adam Kubert: co-creator of Bruce Banner attempting suicide but failing because the Hulk won't let him die (Incredible Hulk #467, 1998)

Michael Lark: co-creator of Steve Rogers and Bucky Barnes being nearly the same age; of Vasily Karpov, a Russian officer who helped program the Winter Soldier (Captain America #5, 2005)

Greg LaRocque: co-creator of Hawkeye firing Ant-Man on the arrowhead of one of his arrows (Avengers #223, 1982);

Salvador Larroca: co-creator of Ayesha, an alias of Her, bearing an imperious identity (Fantastic Four #11, 1998); of terrorists with unstable superhuman ehancements becoming human bombs (Invincible Iron Man #1, 2008); of Maria Hill leaving S.H.I.E.L.D. to work for Tony Stark (Invincible Iron Man #8, 2009); of Pepper Potts donning a suit of Iron Man armour (Invincible Iron Man #11, 2009); of Tony Stark and Pepper Potts as a couple (Invincible Iron Man #15, 2009); Iron Man armor with smaller lights across chest and large swaths of yellow (Invincible Iron Man #25, 2010)

Lew LaRosa: co-creator of the Punisher pursuing people who killed his family from behind prison bars (Punisher: The Cell #1, 2005)

Bob Layton: co-creator of Bambi Arbogast, Stark's secretary; of James "Rhodey" Rhodes, pilot and friend of Tony Stark (Iron Man #118, 1979); of Justin Hammer, a business rival of Tony Stark who tries to combat him through criminal proxies (Iron Man #120, 1979); of Hammer hiring Whiplash to attack Iron Man (Iron Man #123, 1979); of Tony Stark's alcoholism (Iron Man #128, 1979); of Tony Stark's space-worthy Iron Man armour (Iron Man #142, 1981); of James Rhodes as a military operative helping return Tony Stark to the USA after his first adventure as Iron Man (Iron Man #144, 1981); of Tony Stark's jet-black Iron Man stealth armour (Iron Man #152, 1981); of Tony Stark's deep sea Iron Man armour (Iron Man #218, 1987); of Tony Stark's cliffside manor overlooking the ocean (Iron Man #222, 1987); of Hammer trying to obtain his own version of the Iron Man armor (Iron Man #225, 1987); of Jack Taggert, a former US soldier (Iron Man #230, 1988); of the Mandarin's agents wearing a ring (Iron Man #241, 1989); of Black Widow's ballerina training (Solo Avengers #7, 1988)

Stan Lee: creator of Journey into Mystery title (Journey into Mystery #1, 1952); of the Tales to Astonish title (Tales to Astonish #1, 1959); co-creator of Spider-Man, Peter Parker, a teenage super hero garbed in red and blue with a red webbing design, spider emblem on chest and lenses in his mask; Spider-Man swinging around on webbing fired from his web-shooters and climbing up walls; Spider-Man motivated to use his powers to help others; Peter's aunt May Parker, who is not aware of Peter's double life (Amazing Fantasy #15, 1962); of Spider-Man's spider-signal flashlight (Amazing Spider-Man #3, 1963); of the Kingpin of Crime, a mob boss who organizes the disparate underworld elements under his leadership from the heart of Manhattan (Amazing Spider-Man #50, 1967); of the Tablet of Life and Time, a mystical stone tablet (Amazing Spider-Man #68, 1969); of the Kingpin's wife, Vanessa (Amazing Spider-Man #69, 1969); of the silver-haired mobster Silvio (Amazing Spider-Man #73, 1969); of the Black Widow's red hair, black bodysuit, Widow's Bite wrist weapon and carrying explosives (Amazing Spider-Man #86, 1970); of the Wand of Watoomb, a powerful mystical staff (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #2, 1965); of the Avengers, a team of super heroes including Thor, Hulk & Iron Man, banded together as "Earth's Mightiest Heroes" because of the instigation of Loki, who plans to turn the heroes against the Hulk (Avengers #1, 1963); of Tony Stark providing the Avengers with their headquarters; of Limbo, an alien dimension (Avengers #2, 1963); of Hulk battling Thor and attempting to lift Mjolnir (Avengers #3, 1964 & Journey into Mystery #112, 1965); of Captain America frozen in ice during World War 2, revived in contemporary times, has difficulty adjusting; Bucky's seeming death during the War; Captain America joining the Avengers alongside Thor and Iron Man (Avengers #4, 1964); of Captain America throwing his shield so that it ricochets and returns to his hand (Avengers #5, 1964); of Captain America using a device to return his shield to his hand; of Zemo, an enemy to Captain America and the Avengers (Avengers #6, 1964); of Hawkeye, Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch as members of the Avengers; Captain America as the Avengers leader who notably leads the aforementioned trio together (Avengers #16, 1965); of Quicksilver and Hawkeye not getting along with each other (Avengers #17, 1965); of the Collector, an extraterrestrial procurer of rare items, including sentient people (Avengers #28, 1966); of Black Widow being redeemed and rescued by Hawkeye (Avengers #30, 1966); of Steve Rogers lying on his application papers in hopes of joining the army; of the vita-ray treatment which helps activate the Super-Soldier Serum; of the Nazi spy's name Heinz Kruger; of officer General Phillips' name (Captain America #109, 1969); of the Falcon, alias Sam Wilson, a costumed African-American hero who is friends with Captain America; of Redwing, the Falcon's small winged companion (Captain America #117, 1969); of Matt Murdock, a lawyer who also fights crime as Daredevil by using his superhuman sensory powers; Daredevil costume with horns on head and red lenses; Murdock blinded as a child while saving a man from a truck carrying radioactive waste; billy club as Daredevil's primary weapon; Murdock as son of the boxer Battling Murdock, who rasied him alone and wanted him to gain a superior education; the elder Murdock dying after crossing a crooked boxing promoter and refusing to lose a fixed fight; Fogwell's Gym as Murdock's training place; Murdock partnered with his college friend Franklin "Foggy" Nelson at Nelson & Murdock law firm; Karen Page as Murdock & Nelson's secretary and object of affection to both men; Daredevil as a "man without fear" (Daredevil #1, 1964); of Daredevil's ability to detect lies; of the Owl, a criminal financeer who wears a green suit and battles Daredevil (Daredevil #3, 1964); of Killgrave, a man dressed in purple who can control the actions of others through the sound of his voice (Daredevil #4, 1964); of Daredevil's red costume; of Daredevil's gimmick billy club which includes a cable line (Daredevil #7, 1965); of the Stilt-Man; of Matt becoming involved with Karen (Daredevil #8, 1965); of Gladiator, a costume designer who makes a Daredevil costume; Gladiator wearing body armor and wielding a saw (Daredevil #18, 1966); of Murdock using the alias "Mike" (Daredevil #25, 1967); of the extraterrestrial Skrulls, from whom the Chitauri were derived (Fantastic Four #2, 1962); of the Watchers, extraterrestrials who observe the transpirings about the universe without interference (Fantastic Four #13, 1963); of a sub-atomic universe which Ant-Man's shrinking power can access (Fantastic Four #16, 1963); of Wakanda, a remote African nation largely cut off from outsiders; T'Challa, king of Wakanda, a man with cat-like senses who wears the masked identity of the Black Panther (Fantastic Four #52, 1966); of Vibranium, a rare metal found in Wakanda with unusual, unpredictable properties; King T'Chaka, the aged father of T'Challa and king of Wakanda until he was murdered; of the Wakandans worshiping black panthers; Klaw, a mercenary; Klaw invading Wakanda to obtain Vibranium; Klaw losing one of his hands (Fantastic Four #53, 1966); of the giant statues of black panthers which adorn Wakanda (Fantastic Four #54, 1966); of the Kree, an extraterrestrial race of conquerors (Fantastic Four #64, 1967); of Ronan the Accuser, a Kree who wields the hammer-like Universal Weapon (Fantastic Four #65, 1967); of Him, a gold-skinned artificial being who emerges from a coccoon (Fantastic Four #66, 1967); of the Hulk, Bruce Banner, a physicist who transforms into a massive, brutish creature with superhuman strength after exposure to gamma radiation; Banner and/or the Hulk wearing the colour purple; the Hulk describing others as "puny"; General Thaddeus Ross, a military officer who formerly employed Bruce Banner and becomes an enemy of the Hulk; Betty Ross, daughter of General Ross and love interest of Bruce; Rick Jones, a young man who befriends the Hulk (Incredible Hulk #1, 1962); of the Hulk colored green (Incredible Hulk #2, 1962); of the Hulk traveling vast distances by leaping (Incredible Hulk #3, 1962); of Berhert, an alien world (Incredible Hulk #111, 1969); of Thor, Norse god of thunder, defender of Earth, wields hammer Mjolnir which can control storms, always returns to his hand and can only be lifted by those who are worthy of its power; Thor's silver helmet, blue costume with plated chest, bare arms and red cape; Thor battling extraterrestrials made of stone; Thor using the mortal alias of Donald Blake (Journey into Mystery #83, 1962); of Jane Foster, Thor's mortal love interest (Journey into Mystery #84, 1962); of Loki, Thor's evil brother who possesses the power to cast illusions and wears green/yellow; Asgard, home of the Norse Gods which connects to Earth via the rainbow bridge Bifrost; Heimdall, guardian of Bifrost; Odin, father of Loki & Thor (Journey into Mystery#85, 1962); of Loki being placed on trial in Asgard; Loki's power of mind control (Journey into Mystery #88, 1963); of Odin wearing a cape fastened over his shoulders (Journey into Mystery #89, 1963); of Odin disapproving of Thor's feelings for Jane Foster (Journey into Mystery #90, 1963); of Frigga, queen of Asgard, mother to Thor & Loki (Journey into Mystery #92, 1963); of Loki trying to usurp Odin's throne (Journey into Mystery #94, 1963); of Bor, father of Odin, grandfather of Thor; Muspelheim, one of the Nine Worlds; Yggdrasil, the world-tree which envelopes the Nine Worlds; the Frost Giants, creatures from the Nine Worlds; Odin's title "All-Father" (Journey into Mystery #97, 1963); of the Asgardians and Frost Giants going to war with each other (Journey into Mystery #98, 1963); of Sif, female Asgardian warrior, love interest to Thor; Niffleheim, one of the Nine Worlds (Journey into Mystery #102, 1964); of Asgardians piloting sky ships (Journey into Mystery #103, 1964); of Laufey, Loki's father, a giant; of Jotunheim, land of the giants; of Odin adopting Loki to be Thor's foster brother (Journey into Mystery #112, 1965); of Thor and Loki being friends in their youth (Journey into Mystery #113, 1965); of "Crusher" Creel (Journey into Mystery #114, 1965); of the Destroyer, a massively powerful suit of automated armor built by Odin with destructive energy blasts emitted from its face and which battles Thor (Journey into Mystery #118, 1965); of Volstagg, a red-haired, overweight and jovial Asgardian warrior with a wife and several children; Hogun, a mostly-silent grim-faced and dark-haired Asgardian; and Fandral, a blond, green-clad, dashing, adventurous Asgardian (Journey into Mystery #119, 1965); of Loki seeking to rule Asgard; Asgard possessing advanced technology (Journey into Mystery #120, 1965); of Bruce Banner as a physician (Savage She-Hulk #1, 1980); of Nick Fury, an experienced soldier; of Dum-Dum Dugan, one of the Howling Commandos who wears a derby hat; of Gabe Jones, an African-American soldier in the Howling Commandos; of the Howling Commandos, a World War II unit; of the Howlers' battle cry "wa-hoo!" (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Comandos #1, 1963); of Baron Wolfgang von Strucker, nemesis of Nick Fury (Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #5, 1964); of Captain America and Bucky working alongside the Howling Commandos (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #13, 1964); of Jacques Dernier, a member of the French Resistance who fights alongside the Howling Commandos (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #21, 1965); of Doctor Strange, a sorcerer based out of a sanctum in Greenwich Village who wages war against mystical forces of evil; Strange wearing a blue shirt and orange gloves; Doctor Strange's ally Wong; the Sanctum's window bearing a symbol with two curved lines pierced by a third line; of the Ancient One, Doctor Strange's long-lived master who is based in the east; of Doctor Strange's ability to release his astral form while his body slumbers; of Doctor Strange's golden amulet which contains a mystical eye (Strange Tales #110, 1963); of Mordo, a sorcerer dressed in green who is a former disciple of the Ancient One but is now opposed to Doctor Strange; of Hamir, a subordinate to the Ancient One; of Valtorr, a mystical entity (Strange Tales #111, 1963); of Doctor Strange wearing a magical cape (Strange Tales #114, 1963); of Stephen Strange being a gifted surgeon who cares little for his patients, then lands up in a car accident which ruins his hands, ending his medical career; Stephen becoming disheveled and withdrawn until hearing of the Ancient One and seeking that person out; Stephen discovering the Ancient One is master of magic and becoming the Ancient One's pupil; of Dormammu, a mystical entity who is opposed to the Ancient One; of Agamotto, a benevolent mystical entity (Strange Tales #115, 1963); of the Orb of Agamotto, a mystical sphere (Strange Tales #118, 1964); of Wong's name (Strange Tales #119, 1964); of sorcerers casting magical shields for defense in battle (Strange Tales #123, 1964); of Dormammu embodied as a being made of mystical flame who rules over the Dark Dimension and wishes to conquer Earth; the Dark Dimension as a realm of space with no obvious landmass (Strange Tales #126, 1964); of Doctor Strange's red Cloak of Levitation and round amulet; of Doctor Strange preventing Dormammu from invading Earth (Strange Tales #127, 1964); of Dormammu forging an alliance with a former apprentice of the Ancient One to invade Earth; of Kaecillius, a sorcerer clad in orange and blue who fights Doctor Strange and the Ancient One (Strange Tales #130, 1965); of Doctor Strange's home called a Sanctum (Strange Tales #132, 1965); of S.H.I.E.L.D., an international espionage agency, headed by a council and directed by Nick Fury; Nick Fury wearing an eyepatch; Life Model Decoys; the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier, their mobile headquarters designed like a flying battleship; the enemy group and secret society Hydra with their "Hail Hydra" salute and double-armed gesture; Tony Stark as S.H.I.E.L.D.'s technology designer; S.H.I.E.L.D. flying cars (Strange Tales #135, 1965); of Doctor Strange's amulet being called the Eye of Agamotto; of Rama, a sorcerer aligned with Doctor Strange (Strange Tales #136, 1965); of Eternity, the embodiment of the universe itself (Strange Tales #138, 1965); of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents dressed in blue jumpsuits (Strange Tales #139, 1965); of Hamir's name (Strange Tales #141, 1966); of Jasper Sitwell, a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Strange Tales #144, 1966); of A.I.M., Advanced Idea Mechanics, a cabal of scientists with designs on ruling the Earth (Strange Tales #146, 1966); of the Hydra insignia, a skull atop octopus arms (Strange Tales #151, 1966); of the Living Tribunal, a powerful cosmic being (Strange Tales #157, 1967); of Tony Stark, a wealthy industrialist and designer of weapons for the US Army who goes on a field tour with the army in which he is near-fatally wounded, receiving shrapnel in his heart; Stark captured by rebels and forced to design weapons for them alongside Ho Yinsen, but instead designing a gray suit of Iron Man armor to save Tony's life and enable him to escape using its superhuman strength, flight and other devices; Yinsen dying to give Iron Man time to power up, Iron Man fighting his way out of the rebels' clutches (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); of Iron Man's armor being gold; of Iron Man's unibeam in the center of his chestplate; of Iron Man armor kept inside of briefcase; Iron Man posing as Tony Stark's employee (Tales of Suspense #40, 1963); of Pepper Potts, Tony Stark's secretary and romantic interest; Happy Hogan, a former boxer turned chauffeur and bodyguard to Tony Stark; Stark performing a test drive with a racecar which crashes; Stark Industries, Tony's technology company (Tales of Suspense #45, 1963); of Anton Vanko, a Russian scientist who does battle with Iron Man; Tony Stark's business under scrutiny by the Pentagon (Tales of Suspense #46, 1963); of Iron Man wearing red and gold armor (Tales of Suspense #48, 1963); of the Sneepers, an extraterrestrial species (Tales of Suspense #49, 1964); of the Mandarin, a warlord and terrorist leader, ideological opponent of Tony Stark, wears ten rings (Tales of Suspense #50, 1964); of the Black Widow, Natasha Romanoff, a spy who encounters Iron Man (Tales of Suspense #52, 1964); of Hawkeye, an expert marksman who wields trick arrows (such as explosive arrows and cable line arrows) and has a personal relationship with the Black Widow; Iron Man's chief weapon, repulsor rays (Tales of Suspense#57, 1964); of Jarvis, an entity who serves Tony Stark (Tales of Suspense #59, 1964); of the Super-Soldier Serum's creator being named Abraham Erskine (Tales of Suspense #63, 1965); of the Black Widow's Widow's Line device (Tales of Suspense #64, 1965); of Batroc, a French mercenary and kickboxer who wants to test his mettle against Captain America; Agent 13, a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and love interest to Captain America; of Peggy Carter, an intelligence operative and wartime love interest of Captain America (Tales of Suspense#75, 1966); of Captain America's sometimes-strained relationship with Nick Fury and good standing within S.H.I.E.L.D. (Tales of Suspense #78, 1966); of the Cosmic Cube, a massively powerful artifact which the Red Skull seeks to control (Tales of Suspense #79, 1966); of the Red Skull plotting a bombing assault near the end of World War II (Tales of Suspense #80, 1966); of Tony Stark keeping older suits of Iron Man armour in display cases (Tales of Suspense #90, 1967); of Captain America's shield being indestructible; of A.I.M.'s leader having "a huge brain" (M.O.D.O.K. in Tales of Suspense #93, 1967); of Agent 13's real name Sharon Carter; Captain America romantically involved with Sharon (Tales of Suspense #95, 1967); of Whiplash, a criminal with a metallic whip charged with electricity who can pierce Iron Man's armor; of Black Panther meeting Captain America during a struggle against Zemo and ultimately becoming his ally (Tales of Suspense #97, 1968); of Groot, an immense tree-like being from Planet X (Tales to Astonish #13, 1960); of Henry Pym, a scientist who develops a chemical formula which can shrink people in size and uses this ability to interact with ants (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962); of Ant-Man, the costumed identity of Henry Pym wherein he wears a protective red and black costume with size-changing capsules on his belt and wears a helmet which helps him communicate with ants; Pym receiving heightened strength by shrinking in size; Pym keeping an anthill in his laboratory in order to study the insects (Tales to Astonish #35, 1962); of Ant-Man punching his way out of a vacuum cleaner (Tales to Astonish #37, 1962); of the Wasp, Ant-Man's female sidekick and love interest adorned in a red and black costume with insect-like wings permitting flight (Tales to Astonish #44, 1963); of Kraglin, an extraterrestrial criminal (Tales to Astonish #46, 1963); of Pym's nickname "Hank"; Ant-Man riding flying ants into battle; Ant-Man distraught when one of his flying ants dies while helping him (Tales to Astonish #47, 1963); of Ant-Man modifying his powers to increase his size, transforming himself into an enormous, super-strong Giant-Man (Tales to Astonish #49, 1963); of Banner transforming into the Hulk during periods of high emotional stress; of the Hulk having a savage or childlike disposition (Tales to Astonish #60, 1964); of the Leader, an intelligent man (Tales to Astonish #62, 1964); of the Leader being a gamma-irradiated man with a large head (Tales to Astonish #63, 1965); of the Hulk producing a shockwave by clapping his hands (Tales to Astonish #65, 1965); of Banner's identity as the Hulk becoming public knowledge, forcing Banner to give up his normal life and live as a fugitive from General Ross and others (Tales to Astonish #77, 1966); of Hulk's quote "Hulk smash" (Tales to Astonish #88, 1967); of the Abomination, a Russian man exposed to gamma rays which transform him into a monstrous creature who fights the Hulk (Tales to Astonish #90, 1967); of Earth referred to as Midgard by Asgardians (Thor #126, 1966); of the Warlock's Eye, a mystical artifact in Odin's custody (Thor #129, 1966); of Ego, the living planet, a massive creature in the form of a planet with a face etched upon its surface; Ego destroying all other life within a galaxy (Thor #132, 1966); Ego having complete control over the environment on his surface, manufacturing bodies and tentacles for himself (Thor #133, 1966); of Odin preferring Sif for Thor; Sif being a raven tressed and red/white clad Asgardian warrior; Jane Foster visiting Asgard (Thor #136, 1967); of Thor being sent to Earth as punishment by Odin to teach him humility after a clash with Frost Giants (Thor #159, 1968); of Hel, one of the Nine Worlds (Thor #176, 1970); of people with powers called "gifted" (X-Men #1, 1963); of Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch, twins Wanda and Pietro from eastern Europe; Pietro's power of superhuman speed, Wanda's vaguely-defined powers (X-Men #4, 1964)

Steve Leiber: co-creator of Iron Man developing a prison to contain super heroes who refused to submit to the US government's oversight laws (Civil War: Frontline #5, 2006)

Rik Levins: co-creator of Brock Rumlow's name (Captain America #400, 1992)

Larry Lieber: co-creator of Thor, Norse god of thunder, defender of Earth, wields hammer Mjolnir which can control storms, can only be lifted by those who are worthy and always returns to his hand; Thor's silver helmet, blue costume with plated chest, bare arms and red cape; Thor battling extraterrestrials made of stone; Thor using the alias of Donald Blake (Journey into Mystery #83, 1962); of Jane Foster, Thor's mortal love interest (Journey into Mystery #84, 1962); of Loki, Thor's wicked brother who has the power to cast illusions; of Asgard, the realm where Thor lives; Bifrost, the rainbow bridge which connects Asgard to other worlds; Odin, lord of Asgard, father of Thor and Loki; Heimdall, guardian of Bifrost (Journey into Mystery #85, 1962); of Loki being placed on trial in Asgard; Loki's power of mind control (Journey into Mystery #88, 1963); of Odin's cape fastened to his armour with two fasteners on his shoulders (Journey into Mystery #89, 1963); of Odin disapproving of Thor's feelings for Jane Foster (Journey into Mystery #90, 1963); of Tony Stark, a wealthy industrialist and designer of weapons for the US Army who goes on a field tour with the army in which he is near-fatally wounded, receiving shrapnel in his heart; Stark captured by rebels and forced to design weapons for them alongside Ho Yinsen, but instead designing a gray suit of Iron Man armor to save Tony's life and enable him to escape with its superhuman strength, flight and other inventions; Yinsen dying to give Iron Man time to power up, Iron Man fighting his way out of the rebels' clutches (Tales of Suspense #39, 1963); of the Sneepers, an extraterrestrial species (Tales of Suspense #49, 1964); of Henry Pym, a scientist who develops a chemical formula which can shrink people in size and uses this ability to interact with ants (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962); of Ant-Man, the costumed identity of Henry Pym wherein he wears a protective red and black costume with size-changing capsules on his belt and wears a helmet which helps him communicate with ants; Pym receiving heightened strength by shrinking in size; Pym keeping an anthill in his laboratory in order to study the insects (Tales to Astonish #35, 1962); of Ant-Man punching out of a vacuum cleaner (Tales to Astonish #37, 1962)

Ron Lim: co-creator of Thanos travelling upon a hovering throne (Silver Surfer #34, 1990); of the Kyln, an extraterrestrial prison (Thanos #7, 2004); of Moloka Dar, an inmate in the Kyln; Star-Lord held as an inmate of the Kyln (Thanos #8, 2004); of the Infinity Gems, six all-powerful stones; Thanos seeking the Infinity Gems to assemble his Infinity Gauntlet (Thanos Quest #1, 1990)

Scott Lobdell: co-creator of the red widow icon on Black Widow's belt (Journey into Mystery #517, 1998)

Jeph Loeb: co-creator of "Crusher" Creel as a boxer who fought Battling Murdock (Daredevil: Yellow #1, 2001)

Aaron Lopresti: co-creator of S.H.I.E.L.D. developing a fleet of Helicarriers (Ms. Marvel #13, 2007)

Jorge Lucas: co-creator of Tullk, an extraterrestrial criminal (Annihilation: Ronan #1, 2006); of Christine Everhart, a journalist who is romantically interested in Tony Stark, but also critical of him (Iron Man #75, 2004)

Ralph Macchio: co-creator of Saal, a Xandarian Nova Centurion (Avengers #301, 1989); of the Black Widow wielding handguns (Bizarre Adventures #25, 1981)

Todd MacFarlane: co-creator of the Leader's head being round to indicate a larger brain (Incredible Hulk #342, 1988)

Kevin Maguire: co-creator of Operation: Rebirth's multiple candidates; of Gilmore Hodge, a bully who is rejected from Operation: Rebirth (Adventures of Captain America #1, 1991); of Chester Phillips' first name (Adventures of Captain America #2, 1991)

Alex Maleev: co-creator of Silke, a gangster (Daredevil #26, 2001); of Daredevil battling the Yakuza (Daredevil #56, 2004); of Night Nurse, a medic who treats wounded super heroes such as Daredevil; detective Angela Del Toro (Daredevil #58, 2004); of image of Daredevil on newspaper (Daredevil #60, 2004)

Leonardo Manco: co-creator of Tony Stark using technology to repair injuries done to James Rhodes (War Machine #1, 2008)

Bill Mantlo: co-creator of Carina working for the Collector (Avengers #174, 1978); of Howard the Duck wearing pants (Howard the Duck #2, 1979); of Rocket Racccoon as a swashbuckling hero with the moniker "Rocket;" Rocket based in the Keystone Quadrant and Halfworld; Rocket's friend Lylla (Incredible Hulk #271, 1982); of Tony Stark becoming horrified by the carnage done with his company's weapons and eliminating his weapons production (Iron Man #78, 1975); of Maria Stark, wife of Howard, mother of Tony (Iron Man #104, 1977); of Contraxians, an extraterrestrial species (Jack of Hearts #1, 1984); of Contraxia, homeworld of the Contraxians (Jack of Hearts #2, 1984); of Rocket Raccoon, an anthropomorphic adventurous raccoon (Marvel Preview #7, 1976); of the Nova Corps, an intergalactic force of peace officers comprising Nova Centurions (Rom #24, 1981); of the Punisher battling the Kingpin (Spectacular Spider-Man #81, 1983)

Ron Marz: co-creator of Nebula's body reinforced with cybernetics (Silver Surfer #72, 1992)

Marcos Martin: co-creator of Dr. Strange's Cloak of Levitation behaving as though it had a mind of its own; of Doctor Strange's astral form guiding Christine Palmer through an operation on his chest; of Christine Palmer as a romantic interest to Doctor Strange; of Doctor Strange wearing normal footwear with his costume (Doctor Strange: The Oath #1, 2006); of Nicodemus West, a surgeon who was disliked by Stephen Strange and performed the operation on Stephen's hands after his car accident (Doctor Strange: The Oath #2, 2007); of Stephen bearing horrible scars on his hands from his car accident (Doctor Strange: The Oath #5, 2007)

Val Mayerik: co-creator of Howard the Duck, an anthropomorphic sardonic duck (Fear #19, 1973)

David Mazzucchelli: co-creator of Wilson Fisk controlling the police (Daredevil #227, 1986); of Murdock wearing stubble in both of his identities (Daredevil #228, 1986); of Sister Maggie, a nun who cares for Daredevil (Daredevil #229, 1986); of Sister Maggie tending to Matt after he was first blinded; Matt Murdock's mother still being alive (Daredevil #230, 1986); of Nuke, a government-sponsored soldier who takes red, white and blue drugs to increase his adrenaline and reduce pain (Daredevil #232, 1986); of Nuke's real name Simpson (Daredevil #233, 1986)

Scott McDaniel: co-creator of Daredevil wearing body armor (Daredevil #322, 1993)

Luke McDonnell: co-creator of Obadiah Stane, a criminal businessman determined to seize control of Tony Stark's company so he can revert it to designing weapons (Iron Man #166, 1983); of James Rhodes learning Tony Stark is Iron Man; Rhodes wearing Iron Man armor because of Tony's shortcomings (Iron Man #169, 1983); of Iron Man's ability to control his armors remotely (Iron Man #174, 1983); of Rhodes and Stark falling out with each other (Iron Man #185, 1984); of Tony Stark building suits of armour as a means of trauma therapy (Iron Man #188, 1984)

Roger McKenzie: co-creator of Captain America based out of Brooklyn; Steve Rogers' skill as an artist (Captain America #237, 1979); of Ben Urich, an aging reporter with a relentless dedication to the truth (Daredevil #153, 1978); of Turk as a recurring foe of Daredevil (Daredevil #159, 1979); of Josie's Bar, a dive bar in Hell's Kitchen tended by the titular Josie (Daredevil #160, 1979); of Ben Urich's wife Doris (Daredevil #163, 1980); of Jack Murdock's name; of Roscoe Sweeney's last name; of Hell's Kitchen as Matt Murdock's childhood borough; of Urich becoming an ally of Daredevil (Daredevil #164); of Melvin Potter's name; of Melvin's lady friend Betsy; of Melvin's mental problems (Daredevil #166, 1980); of Daredevil and Punisher being fellow vigilantes but disagreeing sharply on how extreme their crimefighting methods should go (Daredevil #183, 1982)

Mike McKone: co-creator of Mjolnir falling to Earth where it is studied by scientists and various locals attempt to lift it (Fantastic Four #536, 2006)

Steve McNiven: creator of image of Captain America blocking Iron Man's repulsor blasts with his shield (Civil War #7, 2007); co-creator of an elderly Peggy Carter dying in her sleep (Captain America #1, 2011); of the US government being motivated by recent unfortunate tragedies in superhuman battles to legislate all super heroes; Miriam, a woman whose son died during a super hero altercation, blames Iron Man for his death; Captain America refusing to participate in this law because of fears of it being misused, Iron Man siding with the law (Civil War #1, 2006); of Spider-Man siding with Iron Man against Captain America (Civil War #2, 2006); Iron Man leading his heroes into battle with those who follow Captain America (Civil War #3, 2006); of Captain America breaking super heroes who sided against the law out of Iron Man's prison (Civil War #6, 2006); of the Initiative, a S.H.I.E.L.D.-led effort to control superhumans affiliated with the Avengers; of the heroes who sided with Captain America becoming vigilantes and refusing to comply with the law, dividing the Avengers in two (Civil War #7, 2007)

David Michelinie: co-creator of Ultron seeking Vibranium to enhance his robotic body (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #25, 1991); of the Falcon as an Avenger (Avengers #183, 1979); of Wanda and Pietro's surname Maximoff (Avengers #186, 1979); of the Wasp costume Jessica's own costume was derived from (Avengers #194, 1982); of Hawkeye firing Ant-Man on the arrowhead of one of his arrows (Avengers #223, 1982); of Bambi Arbogast, Stark's secretary; of James "Rhodey" Rhodes, pilot and friend of Tony Stark (Iron Man #118, 1979); of Justin Hammer, a business rival of Tony Stark who tries to combat him through criminal proxies (Iron Man #120, 1979); of Hammer hiring Whiplash to attack Iron Man (Iron Man #123, 1979); of Tony Stark's alcoholism (Iron Man #128, 1979); of Tony Stark's space-worthy Iron Man armour (Iron Man #142, 1981); of James Rhodes as a military operative helping return Tony Stark to the USA after his first adventure as Iron Man (Iron Man #144, 1981); of Tony Stark's jet-black Iron Man stealth armour (Iron Man #152, 1981); of Tony Stark's deep sea Iron Man armour (Iron Man #218, 1987); of Tony Stark's cliffside manor overlooking the ocean (Iron Man #222, 1987); of Hammer trying to obtain his own version of the Iron Man armor (Iron Man #225, 1987); of Jack Taggert, a former US soldier (Iron Man #230, 1988); of the Mandarin's agents wearing a ring (Iron Man #241, 1989); of Scott Lang, a divorced ex-convict trying to support his lovable daughter Cassie Lang; Scott stealing the Ant-Man costume and equipment from Henry Pym; Darren Cross, the criminal head of Cross Technologies; Scott Lang using the Ant-Man powers to break into Cross Technologies so he can help Cassie (Marvel Premiere #47, 1979); Pym helping to mentor Scott Lang as Ant-Man, permitting him to keep the costume (Marvel Premiere #48, 1979)

Al Milgrom: co-creator of the Punisher battling the Kingpin (Spectacular Spider-Man #81, 1983); of Hank Pym shrinking and enlarging objects, carrying some inside his pockets (West Coast Avengers #21, 1987)

Mark Millar: co-creator of the US government being motivated by recent unfortunate tragedies in superhuman battles to legislate all super heroes; Miriam, a woman whose son died during a super hero altercation, blames Iron Man for his death; Captain America refusing to participate in this law because of fears of it being misused, Iron Man siding with the law (Civil War #1, 2006); of Spider-Man siding with Iron Man against Captain America (Civil War #2, 2006); Iron Man leading his heroes into battle with those who follow Captain America (Civil War #3, 2006); of Captain America breaking super heroes who sided against the law out of Iron Man's prison (Civil War #6, 2006); of the Initiative, a S.H.I.E.L.D.-led effort to control superhumans affiliated with the Avengers; of the heroes who sided with Captain America becoming vigilantes and refusing to comply with the law, dividing the Avengers in two (Civil War #7, 2007); of Captain America skydiving without a parachute; the Triskelion, S.H.I.E.L.D. Headquarters; Captain America wearing a pseudo-military version of his costume; of Captain America being found in present times by S.H.I.E.L.D. (Ultimates#1, 2002); of S.H.I.E.L.D. creating a simulation of the 1940s to help Captain America adjust to the present but being quickly found out; Nick Fury depicted as Samuel L. Jackson with visible scars around his left eye; the Avengers as a team organized and run by S.H.I.E.L.D. under Fury's guidance; the Hulk resulting from an attempt to recreate Captain America; Iron Man's eyes & unibeam glowing light blue; S.H.I.E.L.D. presenting a new costume to Captain America after his revival (Ultimates#2, 2002); of Thor's claims of godhood being doubted by those who know him on Earth (Ultimates #4, 2002); of Hawkeye's sleeveless costume; Hawkeye and Black Widow as S.H.I.E.L.D. agents who joined the Avengers (Ultimates #7, 2002); of the Chitauri, an extraterrestrial army who battle the Avengers (Ultimates #8, 2002); of Hawkeye married to a woman named Laura with three children (Ultimates 2 #2, 2005); of the Abomination being massive and partially armored (Ultimates 2 #9, 2006)

Frank Miller: creator of Elektra, Matt's college girlfriend, an ambassador's daughter who learned of his abilities; Elektra becoming an assassin who wields two sai in battle while wearing a red costume; of Columbia Law as Nelson & Murdock's college; of Grotto, a minor criminal (Daredevil #168, 1981); of Wilson Fisk's name; of Wilson Fisk as Daredevil's primary enemy (Daredevil #170, 1981); of the Hand, a clan of evil ninjas who battle Daredevil and Elektra (Daredevil #174, 1981); of Stick, Matt and Elektra's mentor; of the Hand surviving being lit on fire (Daredevil #176, 1981); of Stick training Matt how to use his powers; of Urich working against Fisk; of Randolph Cherryh, a politician who works with Fisk (Daredevil #177, 1981); of Elektra being killed with one of her own sai (Daredevil #181, 1982); of the Hand's ability to mystically resurrect fallen warriors (Daredevil #187, 1982); of Stick's order and their war against the Hand ninja clan; of Stone, a member of Stick's order (Daredevil #188, 1982); (Daredevil #188, 1982); of the Hand seeking to make Elektra their chief warrior and resurrect her (Daredevil #190, 1982); co-creator of the Punisher being sent to prison (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #15, 1981); of Turk as a recurring foe of Daredevil (Daredevil #159, 1979); of Josie's Bar, a dive bar in Hell's Kitchen tended by the titular Josie (Daredevil #160, 1979); of Ben Urich's wife Doris (Daredevil #163, 1980); of Roscoe Sweeney's last name; of Hell's Kitchen as Matt Murdock's childhood borough; of Urich becoming an ally of Daredevil (Daredevil #164, 1980); of Melvin Potter's name; of Melvin's lady friend Betsy; of Melvin's mental problems (Daredevil #166, 1980); of Daredevil and Punisher being fellow vigilantes but disagreeing sharply on how extreme their crimefighting methods should go (Daredevil #183, 1982); of Wilson Fisk controlling the police (Daredevil #227, 1986); of Murdock wearing stubble in both of his identities (Daredevil #228, 1986); of Sister Maggie, a nun who cares for Daredevil (Daredevil #229, 1986); of Sister Maggie tending to Matt after he was first blinded; of Matt Murdock's mother still being alive (Daredevil #230, 1986); of Nuke, a government-sponsored soldier who takes red, white and blue drugs to increase his adrenaline and reduce pain (Daredevil #232, 1986); of Nuke's real name Simpson (Daredevil #233, 1986); of Murdock wearing black costume while operating as anonymous vigilante (Daredevil: The Man Without Fear #2, 1993); of Rigoletto, mob boss who preceded Wilson Fisk (Daredevil: The Man Without Fear #3, 1993); of the Hand worshipping a demon (Elektra: Assassin #1, 1986)

John Jackson Miller: co-creator of Christine Everhart, a journalist who is romantically interested in Tony Stark, but also critical of him (Iron Man #75, 2004)

Doug Moench: co-creator of the Pursuers, powerful Kree soldiers (Inhumans #11, 1977); of Eric Savin, a former soldier with superhuman abilities (Marvel Comics Presents #26, 1989); of Harold Meachum suffering from ill health after killing Iron Fist's parents; of Joy Meachum, Harold's daughter; of Iron Fist battling ninjas (Marvel Premiere #18, 1974); of Ward Meachum, a relative of Harold and Joy who bears a grudge against Iron Fist and hires men to attack him; of Colleen Wing, a Japanese woman, ally and sometimes love interest of Iron Fist (Marvel Premiere #19, 1974); of the extraterrestrial Bereet and her species, the Krylorians (Rampaging Hulk #1, 1977); of the Lem, an extraterrestrial race with red skin and a snake-like body (Shogun Warriors #19, 1980)

Jim Mooney: co-creator of the Tablet of Life and Time, a mystical stone tablet (Amazing Spider-Man #68, 1969)

Alan Moore: co-creator of Earth referred to by the number "616" (Daredevils #7, 1983)

Tom Morgan: co-creator of the US government asserting its ownership of Captain America's costume and shield (Captain America #332, 1987); of a vast array of Iron Man armours being kept within a secret bunker (Iron Man #318, 1995)

Gray Morrow: co-creator of Ellen Brandt, a facially-scarred woman who becomes an operative of A.I.M. (Savage Tales #1, 1971)

Win Mortimer: co-creator of Night Nurse; Christine Palmer, a medical practitioner (Night Nurse #1, 1972)

Paul Neary: co-creator of the Red Skull's name Johann Shmidt (Captain America #298, 1984); of Captain America's shield being made of Vibranium (Captain America #303, 1985); of S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Jack Rollins; Hydra taking over S.H.I.E.L.D. from within, including control over its council; Jasper Sitwell allying with the conspiracy (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #1, 1988); of Alexander Pierce, close associate of Nick Fury, S.H.I.E.L.D. operative (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #3, 1988); of S.H.I.E.L.D. exposed as rife with internal corruption and dismantled (Nick Fury vs. S.H.I.E.L.D. #6, 1988)

Fabian Nicieza: co-creator of Operation: Rebirth's multiple candidates; of Gilmore Hodge, a bully who is rejected from Operation: Rebirth (Adventures of Captain America #1, 1991); of Chester Phillips' first name (Adventures of Captain America #2, 1991); of the Nova Corps Centurion Saal's name (New Warriors #40, 1993); of Helmut Zemo taking advantage of the animosity between Captain America and Iron Man so he can manipulate them to his own ends (Thunderbolts #105, 2006)

Ann Nocenti: co-creator of Matt Murdock going to regular confession (Daredevil #267, 1989)

Cary Nord: co-creator of Tony Stark injecting himself with nanomachines to interface with the Iron Man armour (Ultimate Human #1, 2008)

Dennis O'Neil: co-creator of the Punisher being sent to prison (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #15, 1981); of Obadiah Stane, a criminal businessman determined to seize control of Tony Stark's company so he can revert it to designing weapons (Iron Man #166, 1983); of James Rhodes learning Tony Stark is Iron Man; Rhodes wearing Iron Man armor because of Tony's shortcomings (Iron Man #169, 1983); of Iron Man's ability to control his armors remotely (Iron Man #174, 1983); of Rhodes and Stark falling out with each other (Iron Man #185, 1984); of Tony Stark building suits of armour as a means of trauma therapy (Iron Man #188, 1984); of Iron Monger, a suit of armor based on Iron Man's which Obadiah Stane wears to fight Stark, leading to Stane's death; Iron Man's armour coloured red & silver; Iron Man armour with triangular unibeam (Iron Man #200, 1985); of Kamar-Taj, the mystical base of the Ancient One in the far east; of the Ancient One as a bald person (Strange Tales #148, 1966)

Ryan Odagawa: co-creator of Friday, an artificial intelligence used by Iron Man which has a feminine personality (Iron Man #53, 2002)

Jerry Ordway: co-creator of Ego's spores regrowing him on other worlds, including Earth (Maximum Security #1, 2001)

Joe Orlando: co-creator of Daredevil's ability to detect lies; of the Owl, a criminal financeer who wears a green suit and battles Daredevil (Daredevil #3, 1964); of Killgrave, a man dressed in purple who can control the actions of others through the sound of his voice (Daredevil #4, 1964)

John Ostrander: co-creator of Luke Cage avoiding profanity because of his upbringing (Heroes for Hire #4, 1997); of Ant-Man wearing a helmet with full face mask (Heroes for Hire #6, 1997)

Carlos Pacheco: co-creator of the Wasp wearing a black costume with a yellow chest (Avengers Forever #1, 1998)

Carlo Pagulayan: co-creator of the Sakaarians, an extraterrestrial race with stone-like technology (Incredible Hulk #92, 2006); of Korg, an extraterrestrial man made of stone dressed in gladiator costume who battles Thor (Incredible Hulk #93, 2006)

Greg Pak: co-creator of the Sakaarians, an extraterrestrial race with stone-like technology (Incredible Hulk #92, 2006); of Korg, an extraterrestrial man made of stone dressed in gladiator costume who battles Thor (Incredible Hulk #93, 2006); of Tony Stark using technology to repair injuries done to James Rhodes (War Machine #1, 2008)

Jimmy Palmiotti: co-creator of Colleen Wing wearing a white jumpsuit (Daughters of the Dragon #1, 2006)

Paul Pelletier: co-creator of Gamora, Drax, Star-Lord, Rocket Raccoon, Mantis and Groot banded together as the Guardians of the Galaxy; the Guardians of the Galaxy on Knowhere; the Guardians of the Galaxy wearing matching uniforms; Rocket as the team's tactician; Rocket disliking Cosmo (Guardians of the Galaxy #1, 2008)

George Perez: co-creator of Patsy Walker being capable in a fight; of Patsy's mother Dorothy Walker (Avengers #141, 1975); of Jocasta, an artificial intelligence (Avengers #171, 1978); of the Wasp costume Jessica Jones' own costume was derived from (Avengers #194, 1982); of Ultron assaulting an eastern European nation (Avengers #19, 1999); of Ultron leading an army of similar robots into battle (Avengers #20, 1999)

Don Perlin: co-creator of Patsy Walker having comics books based on her life as created by her mother (Defenders #89, 1980)

Brandon Peterson: co-creator of Stephen trying to write his own name after his car accident; of Stephen exhausting his personal fortune in failed operations on his hands (Strange #2, 2004); of the Ancient One wearing yellow; of the Ancient One telling Stephen to open his third eye (Strange #3, 2005); of sorcerers conjuring shields with decorative glyphs (Strange #5, 2005)

Keith Pollard: co-creator of the A'askavarii, an extraterrestrial race (Black Goliath #5, 1976); of the Xandarians, an alien race very similar to humans (Fantastic Four#204, 1979); of Xandar, homeworld of the Xandarians (Fantastic Four #205, 1979); of the Pursuers, powerful Kree soldiers (Inhumans #11, 1977)

Christopher Priest: co-creator of Black Panther wearing a Vibranium-weave uniform with lenses in his mask and anti-metal claws in his gloves; of T'Challa wearing a beard (Black Panther #1, 1998); of Black Panther wearing a necklace of talons around his neck (Captain America #13, 1999); of the panther god Black Panther worships being the Egyptian god Bast (Black Panther #21, 2000); of Black Panther being driven into a murderous rage while pursuing his father's killer (Black Panther #29, 2001); of Everett Ross, a US government official who is charged with working alongside super heroes (Ka-Zar #17, 1998)

Howard Purcell: co-creator of Jasper Sitwell, a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (Strange Tales #144, 1966)

Joe Quesada: co-creator of Matt Murdock wearing red-tinted sunglasses (Daredevil #1, 1998)

Tom Raney: co-creator of Groot's vocabulary limited to little more than "I am Groot" (Annihilation: Conquest #2, 2008); of Rocket Raccoon sticking Groot's remains in a planter to regrow him (Annihilation: Conquest #6, 2008)

Brian Reed: co-creator of S.H.I.E.L.D. developing a fleet of Helicarriers (Ms. Marvel #13, 2007)

Bill Reinhold: co-creator of the Punisher's Catholicism (Punisher #30, 1990)

Don Rico: co-creator of the Black Widow, Natasha Romanoff, a spy who encounters Iron Man (Tales of Suspense #52, 1964)

Frank Robbins: co-creator of Montgomery, Lord Falsworth, British soldier and wartime ally of Captain America (Invaders #7, 1976)

Darick Robertson: co-creator of the Nova Corps Centurion Saal's name (New Warriors #40, 1993)

Ivan Rodriguez: co-creator of Colleen Wing as a member of the Hand (Shadowland: Daughters of the Shadow #1, 2010); of Colleen leaving the Hand (Shadowland: Daughters of the Shadow #3, 2010)

Marshall Rogers: co-creator of Colleen Wing as a Daughter of the Dragon (Deadly Hands of Kung Fu #32, 1977); of the Collector pursuing Infinity Gems (Silver Surfer#7, 1988)

John Romita: co-creator of the Kingpin of Crime, a mob boss who organizes the disparate underworld elements under his leadership from the heart of Manhattan (Amazing Spider-Man #50, 1967); of the Tablet of Life and Time, a mystical stone tablet (Amazing Spider-Man #68, 1969); of the Kingpin's wife, Vanessa (Amazing Spider-Man #69, 1969); of the silver-haired mobster Silvio (Amazing Spider-Man #73, 1969); of the Black Widow's red hair, black bodysuit, Widow's Bite wrist weapon and carrying explosives (Amazing Spider-Man #86, 1970); of the Punisher, a war veteran who becomes a vigilante, wearing a black costume with white skull design on his chest and wielding vast arsenal of firearms and explosives in a one-man war on crime (Amazing Spider-Man #129, 1974); of the Falcon's red costume (Captain America #144, 1971); of Luke Cage, born in Georgia as Carl Lucas; Carl's childhood friendship with Willis Stryker; Stryker framing Lucas for a crime, sending Carl to the island Seagate Prison; Carl meeting criminals Shades and Comanche at Seagate and refusing to work with them; Carl being abused by the racist guard Albert Rackham; Carl being subjected to an experimental nutrient bath by Dr. Noah Burstein but being sabotaged by Rackham, causing an accident which grants Carl superhuman strength and unbreakable skin; Carl escaping Seagate, swimming to shore and adopting the name Luke Cage while he goes on the run; Luke wearing a yellow shirt and blue pants; Luke wearing a silver tiara and bracelets; of Cage haunted by the death of Reva Connors; of Luke as a Hero for Hire in Harlem; of Luke's young friend David Griffith (Hero for Hire #1, 1972); of Banner's identity as the Hulk becoming public knowledge, forcing Banner to give up his normal life and live as a fugitive from General Ross and others (Tales to Astonish #77, 1966)

John Romita Jr.: co-creator of Maria Hill working for the Avengers (Avengers #1, 2010); of Matt Murdock going to regular confession (Daredevil #267, 1989); of Murdock wearing black costume while operating as anonymous vigilante (Daredevil: The Man Without Fear #2, 1993); of Rigoletto, mob boss who preceded Wilson Fisk (Daredevil: The Man Without Fear #3, 1993); of Bruce Banner using the online alias "Mr. Green" for correspondence with a mysterious figure known only as "Mr. Blue"; of Banner using meditation techniques to calm himself (Incredible Hulk #34, 2002); of Sterns trying to obtain Banner's blood for his experiments (Incredible Hulk #36, 2002); of Justin Hammer, a business rival of Tony Stark who tries to combat him through criminal proxies (Iron Man #120, 1979); of Hammer hiring Whiplash to attack Iron Man (Iron Man #123, 1979); of Tony Stark's alcoholism (Iron Man #128, 1979); of Tony Stark's space-worthy Iron Man armour (Iron Man #142, 1981); of James Rhodes as a military operative helping return Tony Stark to the USA after his first adventure as Iron Man (Iron Man #144, 1981); of Tony Stark's jet-black Iron Man stealth armour (Iron Man #152, 1981); of Loki impersonating Odin to claim the throne of Asgard (Thor #16, 1999)

Luke Ross: co-creator of Peggy Carter suffering from dementia in her latter years; of Sharon as Peggy's niece (Captain America #49, 2009);

Greg Rucka: co-creator of Oscar Clemons, an aged police detective (Punisher #1, 2011); of Frank Castle as a veteran of Middle Eastern conflicts (Punisher #4, 2011)

Paul Ryan: co-creator of the Avengers being responsible to the United Nations (Avengers #329, 1991); of Ant-Man helmet with red lenses (Fantastic Four #405, 1995); of the Mandarin being the master of the rebels who captured Tony Stark (Iron Man #269, 1991); of Tony Stark operating his armour with a headset device (Iron Man #272, 1991)

Gaspar Saladino: creator of the Avengers logo with enlarged letter "A" (Avengers #96, 1972)

Tim Sale: co-creator of "Crusher" Creel as a boxer who fought Battling Murdock (Daredevil: Yellow #1, 2001)

Alex Schomburg: creator of Captain America riding a motorcycle (Captain America Comics #27, 1943)

Marie Severin: co-creator of the Living Tribunal, a powerful cosmic being (Strange Tales #157, 1967); of Hulk's stated desire to be left alone (Incredible Hulk #102, 1968); of the Lemurian Star (derived form Lemuria in Sub-Mariner#9, 1969)

Jim Shooter: co-creator of Captain America & Iron Man having a tense, argumentative relationship (Avengers #165, 1977); of Carina (Avengers #167, 1978); of Jocasta, an artificial intelligence (Avengers #171, 1978); of Carina working for the Collector (Avengers #174, 1978); of Hell's Kitchen as locale patroled by Daredevil (Daredevil #148, 1977)

Bill Sienkiewicz: co-creator of the Hand worshipping a demon (Elektra: Assassin #1, 1986)

Joe Simon: co-creator of Captain America, Steve Rogers, a thin and weak young man who is the chief experiment of Operation: Rebirth, injecting him with the Super-Soldier Serum which makes him a perfect specimen of humanity; of the scientist who creates the serum and is assassinated by a Nazi spy; of the US military officer who oversees Operation: Rebirth; of Operation: Rebirth hidden base beneath a shop with an old woman standing guard above; of Captain America's red, white and blue costume with 'A' on forehead and stars & stripes on his chest; of James Buchanan "Bucky" Barnes, Steve's friend and partner who joins him in battle; of Captain America's triangular red, white & blue shield; of Sgt. Duffy, Steve's drill sergeant; of Camp Lehigh, the location Steve drills at; of Captain America punching Hitler in the face; of the Red Skull, a Nazi agent who battles Captain America and Bucky (Captain America Comics #1, 1941); of Captain America's mask being fastened to his costume; of Captain America's round, red and white shield with star in its center (Captain America Comics #2, 1941); of the Red Skull being German (Captain America Comics #7, 1941); of the Vision, a green-garbed man in a cape (Marvel Mystery Comics #13, 1940)

Walter Simonson: creator of the Dark Elves, including their leader Malekith, who bears a black star on his chest and a half-scarred face; Loki's ability to survive otherwise fatal physical injuries (Thor#344, 1984); of the Casket of Ancient Winters, a mystical artifact which can unleash snowstorms; Svartalfheim, home of the Dark Elves (Thor #346, 1984); of Algrim, a Dark Elf who serves Malekith (Thor #347, 1984); of the Eternal Flame, a mystical flame in Odin's custody (Thor #349, 1984); of the Einherjar, the greatest warriors of Asgard (Thor #350, 1984); of Thor refusing Asgard's throne (Thor#366, 1986); of Thor wearing a beard (Thor #367, 1986); co-creator of the extraterrestrial Bereet and her species, the Krylorians (Rampaging HulK#1, 1977); of Kurse, Algrim's other identity which is as powerful as Thor and garbed in red/yellow armour (Secret Wars II#4, 1985); of Grundroth, a Frost Giant who fights Thor (Thor #375, 1987)

Joe Sinnott: co-creator of Frigga, queen of Asgard, mother to Thor & Loki (Journey into Mystery#92, 1963); of Loki trying to usurp Odin's throne (Journey into Mystery #94, 1963); of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents dressed in blue jumpsuits (Strange Tales #139, 1965)

Dan Slott: co-creator of the Initiative, a S.H.I.E.L.D.-led effort to control superhumans affiliated with the Avengers (Avengers: The Initiative #1, 2007)

Kevin Smith: co-creator of Matt Murdock wearing red-tinted sunglasses (Daredevil #1, 1998)

Paul Smith: co-creator of Kaecillius' name (Doctor Strange #56, 1982)

Frank Springer: co-creator of Jessica Drew's occupation as detective (Spider-Woman #21, 1979)

Richard Starkings: creator of Daredevil logo (Daredevil #1, 1998)

Jim Starlin: creator of Gamora turning against Thanos (Avengers Annual#7, 1977); of cosmic awareness, the ability to sense life on a celestial scale, representing by stars appearing on the user's face (Captain Marvel #29, 1973); of Gamora, a dangerous green-skinned woman who wields knives (Strange Tales #180, 1975); of Gamora's name (Strange Tales #181, 1975); of Gamora's species the Zenwhoberis; Gamora adopted by Thanos; Gamora operating as Thanos' assassin; Thanos' base called Sanctuary (Warlock #10, 1975); co-creator of Thanos questing after the Cosmic Cube (Captain Marvel #27, 1973); of Thanos in love with Death (Captain Marvel #28, 1973); of Drax motivated by the deaths of his wife Yvette and daughter, which involved Thanos (Captain Marvel #32, 1974); of Drax the Destroyer, a green-skinned man with great power and singular focus on hunting his enemies to their deaths; Thanos, a death-worshipping intergalactic warlord who inflicts genocide; Drax's vendetta against Thanos (Iron Man #55, 1973); of Thanos travelling upon a hovering throne (Silver Surfer #34, 1990); of the Infinity Gems, six all-powerful stones; Thanos seeking the Infinity Gems to assemble his Infinity Gauntlet (Thanos Quest #1, 1990)

Jim Steranko: creator of Baron Strucker as the leader of Hydra (Strange Tales#155, 1967); of Hydra being a group which splintered out of Nazi Germany (Strange Tales #156, 1967); co-creator of the Hydra insignia, a skull atop octopus arms (Strange Tales #151, 1966); of the S.H.I.E.L.D. logo, an eagle within a circle (Strange Tales #154, 1967)

Roger Stern: co-creator of Carina (Avengers #167, 1978); of Henry Pym developing health issues from repeatedly changing size; of Dr. Paul Edmonds, a psychiatrist who assesses the mental status of a super hero (Avengers #227, 1983); of Vision wearing casual clothing (Avengers #254, 1985); of Nebula, a blue-skinned villainous space pirate (Avengers #257, 1985); of Nebula related to Thanos; Nebula attempting the destruction of Xandar (Avengers #260, 1985); of Helmut Zemo trying to destroy the Avengers as revenge for the destruction of his family, seeing them as Captain America's family (Avengers #273, 1986); of Steve Rogers' parents dying in his teenage years (Captain America #255, 1981); of Kaecillius' name (Doctor Strange #56, 1982); of Brahl, an extraterrestrial criminal and enemy of the Guardians of the Galaxy (Thor Annual #6, 1977); of James Rhodes as one of the Avengers (West Coast Avengers #1, 1984)

J. Michael Straczynski: co-creator of Tony Stark mentoring Peter Parker (Amazing Spider-Man #519, 2005); of Tony Stark building a new costume for Spider-Man (Amazing Spider-Man #529, 2006); of an inspirational speech which quotes, how one must "plant their feet and say no, you move." (Amazing Spider-Man #537, 2006); Mjolnir falling to Earth where it is studied by scientists and various locals attempt to lift it (Fantastic Four #536, 2006); of Stephen trying to write his own name after his car accident; of Stephen exhausting his personal fortune in failed operations on his hands (Strange #2, 2004); of the Ancient One wearing yellow; of the Ancient One telling Stephen to open his third eye (Strange #3, 2005); of sorcerers conjuring shields with decorative glyphs (Strange #5, 2005); of Thor's modified costume with chainmail sleeves and black boots (Thor#1, 2007); of Bor's horned helmet (Thor#7, 2008)

Tom Sutton: co-creator of Patsy Walker wanting to be a hero (Amazing Adventures #15, 1972)

Duane Swierczynski: co-creator of Zhou Cheng, a martial artist who fights Iron Fist (Immortal Iron Fist #17, 2009)

Tom Tenney: co-creator of Iron Man using an artificial intelligence to design his armors (Iron Man #298, 1993)

Mark Texeira: co-creator of Everett Ross, a US government official who is charged with working alongside super heroes; of Black Panther wearing a Vibranium-weave uniform with lenses in his mask and anti-metal claws in his gloves; of T'Challa wearing a beard (Black Panther #1, 1998)

Jean Thomas: co-creator of Night Nurse; Christine Palmer, a medical practitioner (Night Nurse #1, 1972)

Roy Thomas: co-creator of Black Widow as an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Avengers #38, 1967); of Ultron, the Avengers' enemy, a robot who disguises himself in red robes and works with Klaw (Avengers #54, 1968); of the Vision, a synthetic man with red skin, green costume and yellow cape with a jewel on his forehead; Vision created by Ultron but turned against him; Vision's powers of flight and altering his density (Avengers #57, 1968); of Ultron being built by one of the Avengers, but turning against him; the Vision joining the Avengers (Avengers #58, 1968); of Yellowjacket, a black and yellow costume based on Henry Pym's technology which allows the wearer to shrink in size (Avengers #59, 1968); of Henry Pym marrying the Wasp (Avengers #60, 1968); of Quinjets, the personal aircraft of the Avengers (Avengers #61, 1969); of Hawkeye's real name, Clint Barton (Avengers #64, 1969); of Ultron as a program which can survive the destruction of its body and live on in a new robot form; Ultron rebuilding himself into a near-indestructible form (Avengers #66, 1969); of Grandmaster, a cosmic being (Avengers #69, 1969); of Cornelius Van Lunt's astrology; Nick Fury faking his death by assassination (Avengers #72, 1970); of Quicksilver wearing the colors blue and white (Avengers #75, 1970); of Cornelius Van Lunt (Avengers #77, 1970); of Van Lunt as real estate mogul (Avengers #80, 1970); of Vision and the Scarlet Witch having feelings for each other (Avengers #91, 1971); of Ant-Man's helmet providing environmental seals (Avengers #93, 1971); of Ronan depicted with blue skin; the Kree depicted with blue skin (Captain Marvel #1, 1968); of Karen Page learning Matt Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #57, 1969); of the prison Ryker's Island (Daredevil #63, 1970); of Turk Barrett, a gangster who fights Daredevil (Daredevil #69, 1970); of Doctor Strange's Sanctum being located at 177A Bleecker Street (Doctor Strange #182, 1969); of the name Klaue being related to Klaw (Fantastic Four Unlimited #1, 1993); of Luke Cage, born in Georgia as Carl Lucas; Carl's childhood friendship with Willis Stryker; Stryker framing Lucas for a crime, sending Carl to the island Seagate Prison; Carl meeting criminals Shades and Comanche at Seagate and refusing to work with them; Carl being abused by the racist guard Albert Rackham; Carl being subjected to an experimental nutrient bath by Dr. Noah Burstein but being sabotaged by Rackham, causing an accident which grants Carl superhuman strength and unbreakable skin; Carl escaping Seagate, swimming to shore and adopting the name Luke Cage while he goes on the run; Luke wearing a yellow shirt and blue pants; Luke wearing a silver tiara and bracelets; of Cage haunted by the death of Reva Connors; of Luke as a Hero for Hire in Harlem; of Luke's young friend David Griffith (Hero for Hire #1, 1972); of the Leader's name Samuel Sterns (Incredible Hulk #129, 1970); of Leonard Samson, a rival for Bruce's affections toward Betty (Incredible Hulk #141, 1971); of Montgomery, Lord Falsworth, British soldier and wartime ally of Captain America (Invaders #7, 1976); of the Soul Gem, from which the Infinty Gems were derived; of Him's alias Adam Warlock (Marvel Premiere #1, 1970); of Iron Fist, alias Daniel Rand, orphaned at the age of ten and raised in the city of K'un-Lun, where he trained in the martial arts to become their greatest warrior, passing every test and trial before him until gaining the power to channel his chi into his fist, making it superhumanly powerful; Iron Fist called a "living weapon"; Wendell Rand and Heather Rand, Daniel's parents who perished nearby K'un-Lun; Harold Meachum, Wendell's business partner who betrayed him and had Wendell and Heather killed; K'un-Lun, a hidden city found in the Himalayas which exists within another dimension and only connects to Earth at intervals spaced years apart (Marvel Premiere #15, 1974); of Daniel Rand fighting the dragon Shou-Lao the Undying, an immortal dragon, and received a dragon-shaped brand on his chest from the dragon along with the power of the Iron Fist; Lei Kung the Thunderer, Daniel's K'un-Lun mentor in the martial arts; of the Thunderer's insignia; of Daniel leaving K'un-Lun to return to New York and seek his parents' killer, Harold Meachum; of Scythe, an assassin who battles Iron Fist (Marvel Premiere #16, 1974); of Ellen Brandt, a facially-scarred woman who becomes an operative of A.I.M. (Savage Tales#1, 1971); of Jim Morita, a World War II Nisei soldier who fought alongside the Howling Commandos (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos #38, 1967); of the name Colonel Klaue (Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #39, 1967); of the S.H.I.E.L.D. logo, an eagle within a circle (Strange Tales #154, 1967); of the Lemurian Star (derived from Lemuria, Sub-Mariner #9, 1969); of Odin's ravens Hugin and Munin; of Odin's eight-legged horse Sleipnir; Odin having only one eye (Thor #274, 1978); of Gungnir, Odin's great spear (Thor #275, 1978); of Alfheim, one of the Nine Worlds (Thor #277, 1978)

Frank Tieri: co-creator of Ultron recreating itself from within Iron Man's armor (Iron Man #47, 2001)

Herb Trimpe: co-creator of a S.H.I.E.L.D.-related task force called S.T.R.I.K.E. (Captain Britain #15, 1977); of Berhert, an alien world (Incredible Hulk #111, 1969); of the Leader's name Samuel Sterns (Incredible Hulk #129, 1970); of Leonard Samson, a rival for Bruce Banner's affections toward Betty Ross (Incredible Hulk #141, 1971); of the Lem, an extraterrestrial race with red skin and snake-like body (Shogun Warriors #19, 1980)

Koi Turnbull: co-creator of Black Panther changing from a moderate position in Iron Man's conflict against Captain America before finally taking Captain America's side (Black Panther #23, 2007)

George Tuska: co-creator of Luke Cage, born in Georgia as Carl Lucas; Carl's childhood friendship with Willis Stryker; Stryker framing Lucas for a crime, sending Carl to the island Seagate Prison; Carl meeting criminals Shades and Comanche at Seagate and refusing to work with them; Carl being abused by the racist guard Albert Rackham; Carl being subjected to an experimental nutrient bath by Dr. Noah Burstein but being sabotaged by Rackham, causing an accident which grants Carl superhuman strength and unbreakable skin; Carl escaping Seagate, swimming to shore and adopting the name Luke Cage while he goes on the run; Luke wearing a yellow shirt and blue pants; Luke wearing a silver tiara and bracelets; of Cage haunted by the death of Reva Connors; of Luke as a Hero for Hire in Harlem; of Luke's young friend David Griffith (Hero for Hire #1, 1972); of Claire Temple, a physician who falls in love with Luke Cage; of Stryker taking the identity Diamondback and wearing a green outfit over a yellow shirt (Hero for Hire #2, 1972); of Mariah, an African-American woman who becomes a Harlem crimelord and fights Luke Cage (Hero for Hire #5, 1973); of Luke Cage exclaiming "Christmas" as an epithet (Hero for Hire #11, 1973); of Tony Stark undergoing surgery to have the shrapnel removed from his heart (Iron Man #19, 1969); of Pepper Potts learning Tony Stark is Iron Man (Iron Man #65, 1973); of Tony Stark becoming horrified by the carnage done with his company's weapons and eliminating his weapons production (Iron Man #78, 1975); of Maria Stark, wife of Howard, mother of Tony (Iron Man #104, 1977); of Luke Cage being called "Power Man" (Power Man #17, 1974); of Cornell Cottonmouth, a Harlem crimelord who trafficks in narcotics and fights Luke Cage; of Cottonmouth knowing Cage to be innocent of his crimes; Cottonmouth trying to get Cage to work for him (Power Man #19, 1974)

Jim Valentino: creator of Taserface, an extraterrestrial criminal and enemy of the Guardians of the Galaxy (Guardians of the Galaxy #1, 1990); of Mainframe, a computerized intelligence, ally of Yondu (Guardians of the Galaxy #5, 1990); of Krugarr, one of the Lem species, an ally of Yondu (Guardians of the Galaxy Annual #1, 1991)

Brian K. Vaughan: co-creator of Tina Minoru, an Asian magic user (Runaways #1, 2003); of Dr. Strange's Cloak of Levitation behaving as though it had a mind of its own; of Doctor Strange's astral form guiding Christine Palmer through an operation on his chest; of Christine Palmer as a romantic interest to Doctor Strange; of Doctor Strange wearing normal footwear with his costume (Doctor Strange: The Oath #1, 2006); of Nicodemus West, a surgeon who was disliked by Stephen Strange and performed the operation on Stephen's hands after his car accident (Doctor Strange: The Oath #2, 2007); of Stephen bearing horrible scars on his hands from his car accident (Doctor Strange: The Oath #5, 2007)

Sal Velluto: co-creator of Black Panther wearing a necklace of talons around his neck (Captain America #13, 1999); of the panther god Black Panther worships being the Egyptian god Bast (Black Panther #21, 2000); of Black Panther being driven into a murderous rage while pursuing his father's killer (Black Panther #29, 2001)

Ron Wagner: co-creator of Foggy Nelson learning Murdock is Daredevil (Daredevil #347, 1995)

Mark Waid: co-creator of Captain America honoured with an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institute (Captain America#3, 1998)

Brad Walker: co-creator of Groot's iterations of "I am Groot" having multiple meanings (Guardians of the Galaxy #17, 2009)

Lee Weeks: co-creator of Fisk committing murder during his childhood; of Daredevil bringing down Fisk's criminal empire (Daredevil #300, 1992)

Len Wein: co-creator of Blake Tower, New York district attorney frequently embroiled in Nelson & Murdock's affairs (Daredevil #124, 1975); of Daniel Rand fighting the dragon Shou-Lao the Undying, an immortal dragon, and received a dragon-shaped brand on his chest from the dragon along with the power of the Iron Fist; Lei Kung the Thunderer, Daniel's K'un-Lun mentor in the martial arts; of the Thunderer's insignia; of Daniel leaving K'un-Lun to return to New York and seek his parents' killer, Harold Meachum; of Scythe, an assassin who battles Iron Fist (Marvel Premiere #16, 1974); of Luke Cage being called "Power Man" (Power Man #17, 1974); of Daniel Drumm, Haitian magic user (Strange Tales #169, 1973); of Brahl, an extraterrestrial criminal and enemy of the Guardians of the Galaxy (Thor Annual #6, 1977)

David Wenzel: co-creator of Carina working for the Collector (Avengers #174, 1978)

Dave Wilkins: co-creator of Brett Mahoney, a police detective (Marvel Comics Presents #1, 2007)

Barry Windsor-Smith: co-creator of Ultron as a program which can survive the destruction of its body and live on in a new robot form; Ultron rebuilding himself into a near-indestructible form (Avengers #66, 1969)

Marv Wolfman: co-creator of Blake Tower, New York district attorney frequently embroiled in Nelson & Murdock's affairs (Daredevil #124, 1975); of the Xandarians, an alien race very similar to humans (Fantastic Four #204, 1979); of Xandar, homeworld of the Xandarians (Fantastic Four #205, 1979); of the Nova Centurions, Xandarian soldiers garbed in uniforms with chin-exposed helmets, a red starburst on their foreheads and a triangular star pattern on their chests; Dey, a Xandarian Nova Centurion; Nova Prime, title given to most powerful Nova Centurions (Nova #1, 1976); of Spider-Woman's Jessica Drew identity (Spider-Woman #1, 1978)

Wally Wood: co-creator of Daredevil's red costume; of Daredevil's gimmick billy club which includes a cable line (Daredevil #7, 1965); of the Stilt-Man; of Matt becoming involved with Karen (Daredevil #8, 1965)

M.C. Wyman: co-creator of Nebula's body reinforced with cybernetics (Silver Surfer #72, 1992)

Leinil Francis Yu: co-creator of Hawkeye joining the renegade team of Avengers who followed Captain America (New Avengers #27, 2007); of the Wasp dying in battle (Secret Invasion #8, 2008)

Guang Yap: co-creator of Ultron seeking Vibranium to enhance his robotic body (Amazing Spider-Man Annual #25, 1991)

Alan Zelenetz: co-creator of deceased Asgardians being set to sea aboard ships, then cremated (Thor Annual #10, 1982)

Patrick Zircher: co-creator of Iron Man creating a defense program with his armors which someone else seizes control over (Iron Man #11, 2006); of Howard and Maria Stark's "accidental" death caused by a conspiracy (Iron Man: the Iron Age #1, 1998)

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